Posted by: Kathy Temean | December 28, 2009

Onomatopoeia & Alliteration Writing Exercize

One of the things that comes up in my beginners writing class is what does onomatopoeia and alliteration mean.

Onomatopoeia:   A word that sounds like what it means, like “sizzle” or “hiss” or “slurp.”  It is pronounced like onna-matta-peeya.

Alliteration:  “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers” is an alliterative sentence.

Now let’s have some fun.  Write a paragraph to a page of narrative that is meant to be read aloud.  Use onomatopoeia, alliteration, repetition, made up words or names, dialect, rhymic effects — any kind of sound you like — but not rhyme or meter.  It must be prose – if prose develops meter for more than a few words in a row, it turns into poetry.

Give it a shot and post it.  I would love to read the results and I bet others would too.

Kathy 

PS: What word in the picture is the onomatopoeia word?


Responses

  1. The Dance of Dusk had nearly ended and the glen was silently slipping into starlit blackness. But the silence didn’t last long. Within moments of night’s shawl falling, the swamp’s dissonance startled the girls. All around them crickets and cicadas sang Swamp Opera to the night theatre, bull frogs and bull alligators roared their availability, wavering black clouds of mosquitoes buzzed. Swamp echoes made night music to the background of splashing and trees rustling as who knew what passed through their dark bowels.

    Like

    • Rebecca,

      Very nice. I particularly like… “silently slipping into starlit blackness… night’s shawl falling.” After visiting you site, I think your pond and Florida expereince really helped you bring the scene alive.

      Kathy

      Like

    • Rebecca, such beautiful imagery!
      Donna

      Like

  2. OK, the word in the picture that’s onomatopoeia is “plopped”. And rather than a paragraph or page (sorry, no time or brain power for length today!), here’s a quick sentence which includes both onomatopoeia and alliteration:

    The snake slithered slickly through the slimey sludge of the swamp.
    Donna

    Like

    • Donna,

      You are correct! I like the sentence. In fact I think it could be included in a book and if you deleted the “slickly” I don’t think an editor could complain about it being over done. Anyway you could slip the slimey sentence into a story?

      Kathy

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      • Thanks, Kathy 🙂 It was just the first thing that popped into my mind, then thought maybe “slyly” instead of “slickly”. Not sure I’d want to write a story about a snake though! lol And no, I didn’t expect a reply to the other post, but since I forgot to check the “notify” box, I had to post again to get it to work! lol
        Donna

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  3. I forgot to click on the “notify” box, so that’s the only reason for this post now! lol
    Brainless!

    Like

    • Wasn’t sure if I needed to respond to this one, too.

      Kathy

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  4. Washing and wishing the dishes would self-scrub, she dropped her dish and . . . crash. Her sponge . . . kersplash. Catastrophe! Cursing her clumsy, slick hands and dawdling, daydreaming mind, she snatched up the broom and dug out the dustpan. Shards swept in a swoosh. Plunked pieces into the bin, clean-up paraphernalia packed up. Sighing, she sunk into the suds to search for the sponge, and washed all that wishing away.

    Like

    • I REALLY liked this, Yousei! (Is that your first name, btw?) SO much of both!
      Donna

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      • Thank you, Donna Marie. I’m posting a revision of this on my blog tomorrow. You are welcome to come by and compare. Please feel free to offer any comments. And “Yousei” is just fine.

        Like

  5. Very nice! I think you have a background in poetry, right? I always feel that poets have an advantage when writing something that sounds lyrical.

    Kathy

    Like

    • Thanks! I still need to do those dishes though. 😉 I’m going to post a revision of this in the next couple of days. I was afraid to wait until I fiddled with it some more before posting it in your comments, knowing I might forget to post it at all. Very glad you liked it.

      Like

  6. […] In response to prompt from Writing and Illustrating. […]

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