Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 16, 2019

Happy Father’s Day and Book Winners

BOOK WINNERS

Phyllis Harris won LOLA SHAPES THE SKY by Wendy Greenley

Donna Taylor won SAM WU IS NOT AFRAID OF SHARKS by KATIE and KEVIN TSANG

Connie Saunders won CASTLE OF CONCRETE by Katia Raina (It hit book shelves on the 11th)

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY

Hope you enjoy the illustrations and your day.

KAYLA HARREN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

Christugeau Dad12
ANA OCHOA – Featured on Illustrator Saturday   

CHRIS ROBERTSON: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

BETTY TANG: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

KATY BETZ: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

XINDI YAN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

CHRISTOPHER JACQUES – Featured on Illustrator Saturday  

HOLLY CLIFTON BROWN – Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

hipster-dad-corrected-melissa-iwai-2015-3

Melissa Iwai – Featured on Illustrator Saturday http://www.melissaiwai.com

ANDRE CEOLIN – Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

RAFAEL LOPEZ – Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

CHARLES SANTOSO – Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

ChristugeauDad1
HOLLY HATAM – Featured on Illustrator Saturday www.hollyhatam.com

Christugeau Dad13

PATRICE BARTON – Featured on Illustrator Saturday  www.patricebarton.com 

Christugeau Dad4

NINA MATA – Featured on Illustrator Saturday    www.beautifique.org 

Christugeau Dad5

CONSTANZE VON KITZING – Featured on Illustrator Saturday     ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++www.constanzevonkitzing.de 

Christugeau Dad14

ANN IOSA – Represented by The CAT Agency Inc. www.catagency.com

 

Christugeau Dad8

IRENE CHAN – www.eneri.net 

Christugeau Dad3

LESLEY BREEN-WITHROW – Featured on Illustrator Saturday lesleybreenwithrow.com 

Christugeau Dad7

PRISCILLA BURRIS – www.priscillaburris.com 

Christugeau Dad11

SHEARRY MALONE – www.shearrymaloneillustration.com 

NINA MATA – Featured on Illustrator Saturday

Christugeau Dad10
KELLY KENNEDY – Featured on Illustrator Saturday  www.kellykennedy.com 

daddybear_l-a

Susan Batori –  Featured on Illustrator Saturday   http://www.batori.hu  

dad walking to school no text

Roger Roth – Featured on Illustrator Saturday http://www.rogerroth.com  

MARIA MOLA – Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

happy father's day2015-Kathy
ANA OCHOA – Featured on Illustrator Saturday   

Enjoy your day, Dads!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 15, 2019

Illustrator Saturday – Anne Lambelet

Anne Lambelet  earned a bachelor’s degree in illustration from the University of the Arts in 2014 where she was awarded the Roger T. Hane award for the top illustration portfolio by a senior.  Since then she has worked with several clients:

  • HarperCollins

  • Simon & Schuster

  • Owlcrate

  • Page Street Kids

  • The Boston Globe magazine

  • The Progressive

  • Minnesota Monthly

  • Virginia living

  • North American Review

  • Grid Magazine

  • Anthology Magazine

  • and more!

 Her first author-illustrated picture book, Maria the Matador, was published by Page Street Kids in February of 2019 followed by a second author-illustrated book, Dogs and their People, in June and The Traveler’s Gift by Danielle Davison in October .

She currently lives in Philadelphia with her husband Brice, her adorable dog, Eevee and her morbidly obese (but also adorable) cat, Fitzgerald. For children’s book illustration, she is represented by Stephanie Fretwell-Hill at Red Fox Literary. You can contact her by emailing her at annemlambelet@gmail.com or by using one of the methods below.

Twitter/Facebook/Tumblr/Instagram

HERE IS ANNE EXPLAINING HER PROCESS:

Like most artists, before beginning the final piece, I start with a thumbnail, a sketch, and a color comp all of which I left out because I think most people get pretty much how those work.

For the final piece though, the first step is to do some more refined line-work which you can see in image #1 in this set. You can see how each of those looks separately once I scan them in images 2 – 5. Once scanned, I bring them all into Photoshop and the coloring starts!

I lay different pieces of tracing paper over that on which I then draw all the little lines that create most of the texture in my work, the shading, any patterns ,

 

(like polka dots, flowers and stripes on clothing n things)

 

 

 

and the lettering.

 

I block in all the base colors using the pen tool and color the line-work (image below).

Then I overlay the little lines and the patterns, color those, and mask out the line-work I don’t think is necessary anymore (image below).

Then I overlay the shading and a few other textures I’ve made over the years by scanning in watercolors, acrylics, chalk, paint splatters, etc. (image below).

And finally I add in the words on top of all the other layers and color those to produce the final image.  Along the way I use a lot of adjustment layers to alter hue, saturation, and contrast of different things as needed.

Add the lettering…  Aaaand…I think that’s about everything!  Hope that was in some way enlightening and/or helpful for anyone out there wondering about my art! Feel free to shoot anymore questions my way if you have them:)

Interview with Anne Lambelet

book cover re-design for Dracula

Zoozil Books

How long have you been illustrating?

Since before I can remember, I’ve always been making up stories and illustrating them.  I guess I first got into being paid for illustration though through online t-shirt design competitions where I really became hooked by having to design around certain prompts and parameters.  Now I’m a freelance illustrator as well as a teacher of illustration at the University of the Arts (UArts) in Philadelphia where I live.

Game of thrones piece for a local gallery show

What and when was the first painting or illustration that you did where someone paid you for your artwork?

I don’t remember exactly, but I think the first time I ever got paid for my art was when I was in 5th or 6th grade. A friend’s mom commissioned me to draw some floral designs and paid me by the hour. It made me feel pretty important and professional.

for Boston Globe magazine

How did you decide to attend The University of the Arts in Philadelphia?

Before going to the University of the Arts for illustration, I actually got a first degree at Case Western Reserve University in computer science. After working for about a year at a small start-up in Cleveland programming iPhone/iPad applications, I realized that I couldn’t keep my passion for illustration on the back-burner anymore.  My boyfriend at the time (now husband) got into a masters program at Penn, and I figured moving to Philadelphia with him would give me the perfect opportunity to go back to school myself and give art a real shot.  UArts looked like it had the best illustration program in the city, and I ended up really loving it.

Did the school help you find illustration work?

The first person to hire me after I graduated discovered my art through the UArts website, and UArts definitely pointed me towards a lot of the tools I needed to promote my work professionally, but they didn’t necessarily get me any jobs directly.

 

Do you feel art school influenced your illustrating style?

Going to art school definitely exposed me to a lot more artists and styles and ways of working than I might have found on my own. It also encouraged me to take a more analytical look at why I was drawn to certain art styles over others.  I think being able to dissect all of my influences and incorporate specific elements from them while discarding others is the most essential part of how I developed my own style.

What type of illustrating did you do right out of school?

My very first job was illustrating a non-fiction picture book for the National Parks, but aside from that, most of the work I initially got was illustrating magazine articles.       

Was illustrating the cover and the chapter art for Greystone Secrets #1: The Strangers your first step into illustrating a book?

No, I’d actually had several jobs illustrating books and book covers by the time I got hired for the Greystone Secrets series.  Timing can be strange and drawn out in the publishing industry so even though The Red Scrolls of Magic came out at about the same time as The Strangers (this past April), I was contacted about doing the cover for Scrolls a little over a year before being contacted to do The Strangers.  I’d also already completed all the art for Maria the Matador and I’d done a few book covers for a smaller publishing company for a series called Aunt Claire presents. They took old books from the early 1900s that are now in the public domain and re-published them with some historical context and info added in by the character “Aunt Claire”.

How exciting was it to get to illustrate Cassandra Clare’s The Red Scrolls of Magic (The Eldest Curses Book 1)

It was so exciting! It was the first time I’d ever been contacted by one of the big publishing companies and about such a major author/series.  The emails I sent to my agent in those next few hours probably included the most exclamation points I’ve ever used in a single day.

How did you decide to write and illustrate Maria the Matador?

I actually came up with the initial idea from a dream I had. At the time though, I think I decided to focus on fleshing out this idea over other ideas because of the statement I felt it could make as a debut book. It encompassed a lot of my main priorities as an author/illustrator: a strong female main character, a fun sense of humor, a lot of classic kid lit influences, and a chance to showcase a range of hand-lettering and illustration skills. First impressions are important, and I hope I made a good one!

Did you get any help or guidance from fellow writers?

I didn’t really get a lot of editorial help with the manuscript from anyone besides my agent and the editors at Page Street Kids, but I did get some guidance along the way from Greg Pizzoli and Zachariah Ohora.  They’d both briefly been teachers of mine at UArts so when I was going through my first publication experience, they were both generous enough to give me their advice along the way.

Was that your first published picture book?

Yup!

Here is the link to read Anne’s book journey.

How did you make the contract with Page Street Kids?

I’d met Kristen Nobles at the SCBWI winter conference in New York. She’d just started Page Street Kids, and she said they were really seeking out new manuscripts and new authors and/or illustrators.  Maria was just about ready for submission at that point so my agent, Stephanie, and I made a special effort to get through those last final touches and get the dummy in front of Kristen as quickly as we could.  Luckily she liked it, and a few weeks later we were negotiating a contract!

Here is the link to Book giveaway and Anne’s Journey with this book. There is still time to leave a comment for a chance to win a copy. DOGS AND THEIR PEOPLE comes out this coming week on June 18th.

 

Since you have two more books coming out this year with Page Street Kids, did you sign a three-book deal that included People and Their Dogs and The Traveler’s Gift?

I didn’t, but it is currently written into my contract that Page Street Kids has optioned all my future fiction manuscripts so, for the time being, they are the first and only publisher to receive a lot of my submissions.

Are you working on writing and illustrating more picture books?

I am! I am currently illustrating a picture book for Millbrook Press that I did not write called How to Build an Insect, and I’m illustrating a fourth book for Page Street Kids that I did author myself called The Poisoned Apple. Both of those will come out fall of 2020.

How long have you been making a living from illustrating?

I’ve been making a living from illustration since I graduated from UArts in 2014 so about 5 years now!

I see you are represented by Stephanie Fretwell-Hill at Red Fox Literary?. How did you connect with them and how long have they been representing you?

I initially had another agent that I’d met at an SCBWI Pitch Day event.  After about a year together, neither of us felt like we were really connecting on which projects we were most excited about, and in 2016 we decided to amicably part ways. After that, I knew how important it was to have an agent who shared my aesthetic sensibilities and my enthusiasm for certain types of stories.  I did a lot of research through various SCBWI online resources and came up with a list of 5-10 agents I felt would really click with my work.  I sent my portfolio out to all of them and Stephanie got back to me within a few weeks.  We talked on the phone, and she seemed like a really great person. Signing on with her has been one of the best decisions of my life, and I’ve been with her for about 3 years now.

Some of your illustrations look like you could have incorporated paper into the illustrations. Is this something you regularly do?

All of my illustrations are actually completed digitally so anything that looks like I’ve incorporated paper is just an illusion. I do collage in a lot of scanned textures though that I make with pencil, watercolors, acrylics and other traditional media.  I really like that most people can’t immediately figure out how I made my art.

Zoozil Books

The book covers you have done for Zoozil Books are beautiful. Have they been published yet?

Thank you! Zoozil is actually an eReader app that electronically publishes interactive historical fiction stories so I believe the books are “published”, but you can only get them through the app and not as actual, physical books.

Did you do the pattern illustrations for a fabric or wallpaper company?

I did a couple of the patterns on my website just as personal projects, and a couple for Owlcrate so that they could go on different products included in their themed subscription boxes.  For instance, the Forbidden Forest pattern I did for them went on an umbrella!

Promo Piece

Promo Piece

Do you ever exhibit your work?

I used to participate in small “gallery” shows at local coffee shops and businesses here in Philadelphia, and I’ve had a couple pieces get into past Society of Illustrators annual shows, but these days, I don’t really actively seek out opportunities to exhibit my work.

Would you illustrate a book for an author who wants to self-publish?

Unfortunately, I try not to illustrate self-publish-ing authors as a rule.  It’s very hard to gauge the level of familiarity self-publishers have with best-practices for dealing with illustrators. They often can’t pay much up front and don’t have a good sense of the actual amount of time you have to put in to illustrate a whole book.  That’s obviously not %100 true across the board, but it’s just difficult to tell up front whether the experience will be a good one or a bad one. To avoid hurt feelings, I’ve just made it a rule for myself to always play it safe and turn them down.  I also just have a lot of ideas of my own, and I selfishly want to use my time to prioritize those.

Interior art from The Traveler’s Gift: A Story of Loss and Hope Hardcover – October 8, 2019

Have you worked with educational publishers? Which ones?

My first job out of college was illustrating a book for Eastern National about the National Parks. I’m not %100 sure if Eastern National would be considered an educational publisher, but, if not, that’s the closest I’ve come.

Have you done any illustrating for children’s magazines? Which ones?

Unfortunately, I haven’t, but I would definitely be open to that if I get the chance!

for Light Grey Art Lab’s Tiny Homes gallery show

Have you ever thought about illustrating a wordless picture book?

My next book with Page Street, The Poisoned Apple, actually started out as a wordless picture book when I was in the storyboarding stages.  After showing it to Stephanie though, we both agreed that some words would really help sell the humor.  I’d love to tackle “writing” a wordless picture book at some point though!

Owlcrate

What do you think is your biggest success?

I think getting Maria the Matador published has been my greatest success. I’ve been fantasizing about writing and illustrating my own book since I was in kindergarten so getting to finally see something I did on the bookshelves at Barnes & Noble was an absolute dream come true.

Boston Globe

What is your favorite medium to use?

My favorite medium is digital.  There are just so many options with ways to use digital tools, and it also allows me to incorporate several different traditional media and collaged elements into a single piece of art.

Commission work

Has that changed over time?

Yes, in college I struggled with a lot of indecision over which medium to settle on.  At different times I was “sure” that watercolor and pen and ink was my medium and then that acrylic paints were my medium, and then I finally started experimenting with digital artwork.  It sort of allowed me to make a decision without really making a decision.

“Get to Know Your Parks”

Do you own or have you used a Graphic Drawing Tablet when illustrating?

I use a Wacom Intuos tablet to illustrate in Photoshop.

for Virginia Living magazine

What materials and/or tools do you use to create your work?

I start with a pencil drawing. I use tracing paper to trace over that several times, creating the linework, shading and hashmark textures you’ll see in all of my work.  Then I scan those, overlay them and color them in Photoshop. Finally I layer in other scanned elements (splatters, hand-painted patterns, etc.) to make my work appear more tactile and textural.

Do you try to spend a specific amount of time working on your craft?

Right off the bat, I established a strict routine for myself as a freelancer working from home trying to mimic the routine of the average office workday. I start at 8:30, take a lunch break at noon, work until 4, take an hour for exercise, and then work the rest of the day as needed depending on deadlines.  I knew if I didn’t hold myself to a routine, it would be too easy to procrastinate and get off track.

“Get to Know Your Parks”

Do you take pictures or research a project before you start?

Yes, especially when I’m working on non-fiction or historical fiction, I collect a lot of reference material beforehand.  I don’t usually take my own photos, but I Google everything and order myself some books on the subject. In a few specific instances, art directors have also provided me with reference material they’ve collected.

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

I definitely think the internet is an amazingly helpful tool for artists.  It’s incredibly easy now to get your art out into the world , and it sort of crowd-sources self-promotion. Once a few people have discovered your art, they’ll start passing it on to other people who will pass it on to other people, etc. and you as the artist don’t have to do all that legwork by yourself to widen your audience. It also brings the people within the artistic community closer. For instance, if I want to ask someone’s advice on the publishing experience, other successful professionals are just a few key strokes away, and it doesn’t matter that they live in New York or California or are award-winning author/illustrators while I’m just starting out.  Things like Twitter make it quick and easy to remove all those obstacles and start a conversation. Plus the internet is full of resources (like SCBWI directories, YouTube tutorials, and blogs like this one) meant to help artists navigate things that would otherwise feel completely incomprehensible.

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

I would love to work on a more elaborately illustrated middle-grade fantasy novel, something a la Wildwood by Colin Meloy and Carson Ellis.  The Greystone Secrets has been my closest experience to that so far, but I’d love to do something that has a few full-color illustrations throughout as well…maybe even something I’ve written myself if I can develop the discipline to crank out a story longer than 32 pages! The Folio Society also creates really beautiful books that feel like every detail is carefully illustrated and designed. I would love to work on something for them someday!

Zoozil Books

What are you working on now?

Right now I’m working on the cover for the next Cassandra Claire book in the Eldest Curses series, and as I mentioned earlier, I’m working on illustrating two new picture books, How to Build an Insect and The Poisoned Apple which I also wrote.

Minnesota Monthly

Grid Magazine

Do you have any material type tips you can share with us? Example: Paint or paper that you love – the best place to buy – a new product that you’ve tried – A how to tip, etc.

My Wacom tablet is my best friend, and I use it every single day. Within Photoshop, I guess the digital tool that has most changed my life is “Photomerge”.  If you scan a large image in pieces, you can bring the pieces into Photoshop with File>>Automate>>Photomerge and it will automatically stitch them together into a seamless single image. Scanning large hi-res drawings would be such a huge pain without it.

Any words of wisdom on how to become a successful writer or illustrator?

Just keep creating new art all the time and putting it out into the world. Send out postcards and targeted email blasts. Post regularly on multiple social media platforms and keep a portfolio website of your own up to date. Try to always have a new manuscript in the works and get it in front of agents and/or editors as soon as it’s ready. If art is made with honesty and passion, there is someone out there who is going to connect with it. You just have to make it as easy as possible for them to find it in the first place.

Grid Magazine

Thank you Anne for sharing your talent and expertise with us. Make sure you share you future successes with us. To see more of Anne’s work, you can visit her at:

Website: http://www.annelambelet.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/annelambelet/?hl=en
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/annemlambelet/photos

If you have a minute, please leave a comment for Anne. I am sure she’d love to hear from you and I enjoy reading them, too.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 14, 2019

June Agent of the Month – Interview with Connor Eck

I’m delighted to introduce Connor Eck, an agent with Lucinda Literary who is actively building an eclectic list in the children’s genre. He is June’s AGENT OF THE MONTH.

CONNOR ECK – AGENT AT LUCINDA LITERARY:

Connor Eck represents adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction, picture books, memoir, business, sports, and narrative nonfiction. Connor looks for fresh voices, unforgettable characters, tightly constructed plot, and thematic storytelling. In nonfiction, he is drawn to powerful narratives that challenge the status quo or ask big questions, original thinkers, and authors with strong platforms.

A sample of books Connor has represented include: YOU BE MOMMY, a picture book in which a tuckered out mother asks her child to “be mommy” at bedtime, and the sequel YOU BE DADDY (Macmillan); BE STRAIGHT WITH ME, a young adult book-in-verse exploring how the author and her male gay best friend unexpectedly fell in love in college (Andrews McMeel); LIFE IS SHORT & SO AM I, the memoir of a little person’s improbable journey to, through, and beyond WWE (ECW Press).

Connor has a passion for writing, nurturing literary talent, and for bolstering the careers of his fellow writers. He received his Bachelor of Arts in English from Union College. To query Connor directly, email connor@lucindaliterary.com

Here is more about Lucinda Literary:

Lucinda Literary is one of very few hybrid literary, marketing, and lecture agencies for authors. We represent books across categories, but specialize in “ideas” or “big think” books that look to change the way people work, behave, and live. Most often, our clients come to us already well-known in their fields as original thinkers or voices—they are business leaders, scientists, or bring a strong media or online profile.

But sometimes, there is just a great title concept. Or a great story that requires a professional writer. We help develop books from the ground up.

Lucinda Literary selectively represents fiction. We primarily look for voice-driven, emotionally raw, and often unconventionally told novels for adults and young adults. In children’s books, we look for stories that transport us and break new ground, much in the way our adult books do.

Bringing a background in marketing, and publicity relationships to every project we represent, we are strategists and advocates not just for the books, but for the entire careers, of our authors. We do not take on a high volume of clients by design, which allows us to be hands-on, attentive, and editorially invested.

Lucinda Literary has worked with all of the major publishers and more, including:

  • PenguinRandomHouse
  • HarperCollins
  • Simon & Schuster
  • Hachette Book Group
  • Macmillan
  • Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Hay House
  • McGraw-Hill
  • Scholastic
  • Amazon

1. What made you decide you wanted to be a literary agent?

I always knew I wanted to do ‘something’ where I could impact storytelling. When I landed with Lucinda Literary, it just felt right.

2. How did you find the job as agent with Lucinda Literary?

Hello, bookjobs.com! And thank you to our president, Lucinda Blumenfeld, for taking a chance on me.

3. Do you work out of the New York City office?

Indeed, with a book mountain on my desk.

4. It looks like you are open to all types of books. Do you have a favorite genre?

This is correct. Hmm… I like all the flavors. Can I plead the fifth?! Okay, if I absolutely had to choose, I’d say that recently I’ve been obsessed with picture books. This might have something to do with the arrival of color interiors for Karla Clark’s YOU BE MOMMY. I can’t wait for Karla’s debut next March—she’s in excellent hands with Feiwel & Friends! It’s a heartwarming role reversal story where daughter becomes mommy at bedtime—and Zoe Persico’s illustrations are utterly gorgeous.

5. Do you have a goal for how many new clients you would like to represent?

I don’t have a specific number in mind. I like to work with good people (criteria #1) who are good writers (criteria #2) who have good stories to tell (criteria #2a). As many of those as I can find without compromising author care.

6. When a writer send a query, would you like to see a few sample pages of their manuscript and maybe a synopsis?

At least the first chapter. I tend not to request pages when a writer submits only a synopsis.

7. What are you feelings about manuscripts with prologues? Should an author avoid at all costs?

I think a book should stand alone without one. If the prologue isn’t killer, axe it.

8. What would you like to see in the query letter? Should writers try to keep it short?

I would like to see brevity. The best query letters are less than 500 words. They include a log line, synopsis, themes stated, marketing pitch, and author bio. Writers should assemble beta readers for query letters as they do with manuscripts!

9. Should the word count for your manuscript be included in the query letter?

Yes, please!

10. Do you like comps mentioned in the query letter?

That would be a nice touch if the comps are immediately recognizable. Ideally these are books that have sold well or found critical success. If not, you’re better off not including comps.

11. Would you have an example of a good query letter to help writers?

I wish! Though I’ve seen many strong query letters, I’m not at liberty to disclose those—so sorry!

12. Have you ever thought about representing an illustrator or do they have to also write?

Have I ever! I would LOVE to represent illustrators. As of 2019, I’m on the lookout. They don’t have to write, but that’s a plus.

13. Do you think it is possible to sell a graphic novel that isn’t illustrated?

Yes.

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR JUNE 2019 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “JUNE FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE” Example: Paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it’s a picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED! Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.

Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: June 20th.

RESULTS: June 28th.

CHECK BACK NEXT FRIDAY FOR the first page results and CONNOR’s comments..

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 13, 2019

BOOK GIVEAWAY: THAT’S FOR BABIES by Jackie Azúa Kramer

Jackie Azúa Kramer has a new picture book titled, THAT’S FOR BABIES and illustrated by Lisa Brandenburg. It hits book shleves on June 25th. Jackie has agreed to share a book with one lucky winner.

All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Jackie!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Prunella wakes up on the morning of her birthday and announces, “I’m a big kid now.” She doesn’t want to do any of the things she usually loves. “That’s for babies!” she announces over and over again. Even her favorite doll, Talking Sally, is abandoned. But what happens when a big kid gets scared during the night.

A story about growing up, for little kids and big kids ages 4 and up.

BOOK JOURNEY:

I had chosen a lovely dress for my daughter, Daisy’s Pre-School graduation. That morning she took one glance at the sparkly frock and said, “That’s for babies!” From that moment on, those words became her mantra. All that Daisy loved and treasured before, including her favorite doll, was dropped in a box of cast-off toys.

In That’s for Babies, on the morning of little Prunella’s birthday, she announces she’s a big girl, and ready for adventure. But one dark and stormy night, she discovers that growing up is a series of small milestones…two steps forward and one step back.

I loved writing this story that shares it’s okay for big girls to play and imagine, explore and be vulnerable.

Now you know the back story to That’s for Babies–here’s what happened next on its journey to publication. Every year I look forward to the excitement and book buzz at Book Expo America held in NYC. In 2017, I wasn’t just a fan, my debut picture book, The Green Umbrella launched. I was invited by the publisher, North South, to appear for a signing! Wow…ME! Crazy!

As always, I couldn’t resist visiting the many publishers’ booths and see all the other new books of 2017. But here’s what—a little known secret is that often, editors are there, too. And that’s exactly what happened as I stopped to browse the beautiful picture books at Clavis Publishing. Philippe Werck, the publisher, and I began to chat. I shared that I was an author and wondered if they were accepting submissions. I emailed Philippe a few stories, and almost fell to the floor when within a few weeks, he agreed to publish three of them.

If You Want to Fall Asleep, 2018, was the first, That’s for Babies, 2019 and Miles Won’t Smile (TBD). So, moral of my story–share what you do, and what you’re excited about!

JACKIE’S BIO:

Jackie Azúa Kramer studied acting and voice at NYU and earned her MA, Queens College, Counseling in Education. Jackie has worked as an actor, singer, and school counselor. Her work with children presented her an opportunity to address their concerns, secrets and hopes through storytelling.

Now she spends her time writing children’s picture books. Her picture books include, the award-winning The Green Umbrella (2017 Bank Street College Best Children’s Books of the Year) and If You Want to Fall Asleep. Upcoming books- The Boy and the Eight Hundred Pound Gorilla (Candlewick); I Wish You Knew (Roaring Brook); We Are One (Two Lions); Miles Won’t Smile (Clavis).

Jackie lives with her family in Long Island, NY. When not writing, you’ll find Jackie reading, watching old movies and globe trekking.

Visit me

Jackieazuakramer.com

Twitter @jackiekramer422

Facebook Jackie Azúa Kramer

Instagram

Jackie, thank you for sharing your book and journey with us. I am sure the winner will love adding this to their collection of picture books. Best!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Cricket Media produces literary magazines for children of various ages – Babybug (for ages 6 months to 3 years), Ladybug (ages 3 to 6), Spider (ages 6 to 9), and Cricket (ages 9 to 14). See the magazines call for submissions below and the details of what they are looking for..

DEADLINE: 1 July 2019
LENGTH: Varies
THEY PAY: Up to $0.25/word for fiction, $3/line for poetry

BABYBUG, a look-and-listen magazine, presents simple poems, stories, nonfiction, and activities that reflect the natural playfulness and curiosity of babies and toddlers. When reviewing submissions, the editors look for manuscripts that please the ear and beg to be read again, as well as those that capture a baby’s ongoing discoveries in a few simple, concrete sentences.

We are particularly interested in manuscripts that explore simple concepts, encourage very young children’s imaginative play, and provide opportunities for adult readers and babies to interact. We welcome work that reflects diverse family cultures and traditions.

Call for Submissions: So Silly

Deadline: July 1, 2019

Babybug (for babies and toddlers) seeks your silliest stories, poems, action rhymes, and fingerplays. We welcome pieces about funny games and goofy situations as well as nonsense rhymes and wordplay that elicits little ones’ laughter. We’re looking for rhythmic writing that babies and toddlers will want to hear again and again. Please keep manuscripts short—poems can be up to eight lines and stories up to six sentences.

Guidelines

Before submitting, be sure to familiarize yourself with our magazines. (Sample copies are available for viewing at the Cricket Media Store, or you can order a current issue by calling 800-821-0115.) Issues are also available at many local libraries.

While BABYBUG does not distribute theme lists for upcoming issues, below you will find a list of some (but by no means all) topics of interest to the magazine’s editors and readers.

  • Babies’ and toddlers’ relationships with others (immediate and extended family members, caregivers, other babies and older children)
  • Relationships with animals (pets, wild creatures, imaginary animals, etc.)
  • Learning new things (rolling, crawling, standing, walking, dancing, feeding oneself, talking, joking, singing, holding/using crayons and other art materials)
  • Daily routines
  • Becoming independent and saying no
  • Imitating adults and helping with household chores
  • Young children’s observations of their surroundings (home and childcare settings, neighborhood and city life, the natural world, familiar places like libraries and stores)
  • Favorite games and toys
  • Wordplay and silly situations that babies and toddlers find funny

Poetry

Rhythmic and rhyming, poems may explore a baby’s day, or they may be more whimsical.

Length: Eight-line maximum.

Stories

Although they are simple and clear, successful BABYBUG stories often end with a gentle or humorous surprise.
Length: Six-sentence maximum.

First Concepts

BABYBUG often features a “first concept,” a playful take on a simple idea. Concepts may be expressed through poems, stories, very short nonfiction, or prompts for simple activities. Please see recent issues for examples.

LADYBUG, a literary magazine for young children, features original stories, poetry, nonfiction, and activities written by the world’s best children’s authors—both known and new. When reviewing submissions, the editors look for clear and beautiful language, a sense of joy and wonder, and a genuinely childlike point of view.

We have particular interests in stories that explore themes of identity (gender, race and ethnicity, neighborhoods, beliefs and traditions); citizenship and global cultures; scientific and technological exploration; and the creative spirit.

Call for Submissions: All AboardDeadline: July 1, 2019

Ladybug (for ages 3–6) seeks short stories, retellings of folk and fairy tales, rebus stories, poems, action rhymes, nonfiction, and songs about travel. For a young child, a walk to the park, a trip by boat or airplane, or a game of make believe might all seem like voyages. We like playful stories with childlike points of view; they need to be short, too (under 800 words). Most of our readers live in the United States, and sensitive explorations of different cultures are welcome.

Fiction

LADYBUG publishes finely crafted and imaginative contemporary stories, original retellings of folk and fairy tales, and funny pieces with human characters or anthropomorphic animals. City settings and stories that take place outside the United States are especially welcome, as well as subject matter that appeals to both boys and girls.

Length: Stories may be up to 800 words, but significantly shorter manuscripts are accepted, and are often appropriate for LADYBUG’s young readers. We are also interested in rebus stories up to 200 words.

Poetry

Poems are generally rhythmic/rhyming; the tone may be serious or humorous. While we accept poems about seasons and the natural world, at this time we are actively looking for poetry that explores young children’s daily lives and their emotions and imaginations. We are also interested in action rhymes (energetic poems that call for physical movement).

Length: Poems may be up to 20 lines in length; on rare occasions, longer narrative poems are accepted.

Nonfiction

The editors seek simple explorations of interesting places in a young child’s world (such as the library and the post office), different cultures, nature, and science. These articles can be straight nonfiction, or they may include story elements, such as a fictional child narrator.

Length: Nonfiction may be up to 400 words; backup materials and photo references may be requested upon acceptance.

Activities and Games

LADYBUG publishes unusual and imaginative activities, riddles, games, and crafts. Please see past issues for models and inspiration.

Songs

We seek playful, engaging original songs. Songs should be lively and interesting, yet simple and short enough for a young child to sing or play on a keyboard with help from a caregiver with some musical background. Original songs (lyrics and a melody line that may include chords) can be uploaded as PDFs. Please see past issues for examples.

SPIDER, a literary magazine for children, features fresh and engaging literature, poems, articles, and activities for newly independent readers. Editors seek energetic, beautifully crafted submissions with strong “kid appeal” (an elusive yet recognizable quality, often tied to high-interest elements such as humor, adventure, and suspense).

We have particular interests in stories that explore themes of identity (gender expression, ability, race and ethnicity, family structure including LGBTQAI+ and single parent homes, neighborhoods, beliefs, and traditions); global cultures and languages (current needs include South American, African, and Middle Eastern countries, island nations, and Native American nations); scientific and technological exploration and innovation; magical or interplanetary landscapes; cities and metropolitan areas; real kids doing real things; weird and sometimes gross stuff; and the creative spirit.

Call for Submissions: Hey, Neighbor!

Deadline: July 1, 2019

Spider (for ages 6 to 9) is looking for stories, nonfiction, poems, and short plays about neighbors and neighborhoods: urban or suburban, rural or fantastical. What unique relationships blossom between people (and animals) who live near one another? Who would be neighbors on a space station or in a magical kingdom? How can kids, real or fictional, make an impact in their neighborhoods? Inter-cultural and inter-generational relationships welcome. Humor always encouraged.

Call for Submissions: Arts and Music

Deadline: July 1, 2019

Spider (for ages 6 to 9) is looking for stories, nonfiction, poems, short plays, and activities for the theme Arts and Music. We want pieces that capture the magic, creativity, frustration, and many hours of practice that come with learning an instrument or new art skill. We’re looking for all kinds of stories about kids and their creative outlets, as well as true stories about unusual instruments, strange stories about familiar instruments, odes to artistic practice, and activities to inspire young artists.

Fiction Stories and Plays

We seek fiction of all kinds: fantasy, folk or fairytale, sci-fi, historical, humorous, or realistic. Whether the setting is long-ago or contemporary, or the protagonist is a shy newcomer, clever trickster, class clown, fantasy creature, or superhero, characters and the worlds they inhabit should be complex and believable. Plays should have 2 to 6 characters so that a child could feasibly perform the play at home with family or friends.

Length: 300–1000 words

Poetry

Poems should be succinct, imaginative, and accessible; we tend to avoid long narrative poems.

Length: Up to 20 lines

Nonfiction Articles

For nonfiction, SPIDER readers enjoy well-researched articles about animals, kids their own age doing amazing things, women and people of color, and cool scientific discoveries (such as wetsuits for penguins and real-life invisibility cloaks). Nonfiction articles should rise above a simple list of facts; we look for kid-friendly nonfiction shaped into an engaging narrative.

Length: 300–800 words

Crafts and Activities

We also appreciate clever crafts, recipes, games, and puzzles; however, please submit only activities that a reader would be able to perform with minimal parental assistance.

Length: 1–2 pages

CRICKET magazine seeks to publish the highest quality fiction, poetry, and literary nonfiction to engage our audience of enthusiastic young readers. Editors consider unsolicited submissions from writers of every level of experience. Since its founding in 1973, CRICKET has published some of the most respected writers of children’s literature. It is also a wonderful opportunity for promising new writers to showcase their best work.

We have particular interests in stories that explore themes of identity (gender, race and ethnicity, neighborhoods, beliefs and traditions); citizenship and global cultures; scientific and technological exploration; and the creative spirit.

Call for Submissions: Encountering Nature

Deadline: July 1, 2019

Cricket (for ages 9-14) seeks fiction, nonfiction, and poetry on the theme of an encounter with nature. You might write about a record-setting blizzard or the joy of the first day of spring; conquering Everest or exploring a local cave; meeting a mountain lion while hiking, a squirrel in the backyard, an itsy-bitsy spider in the shower; or about a young nature lover who helps an injured animal or strives to preserve something of wild and natural beauty.

Call for Submissions: A New Beginning

Deadline: July 1, 2019

Cricket (for ages 9-14) seeks fiction, nonfiction, and poetry on the theme of making a new beginning. Stories might focus on the immigrant experience; on a middle schooler facing up to responsibilities or changes in the family; the end of one friendship and the start of another; try-trying again after a setback; or taking on a new hobby, sport—even a whole new persona.

Guidelines

Before submitting, be sure to familiarize yourself with our magazines. (Sample copies are available for viewing at the Cricket Media Store, or you can order a current issue by calling 800-821-0115.) Issues are also available at many local libraries.

Fiction

CRICKET is interested in realistic contemporary fiction, historical fiction, science fiction and fantasy, folk tales, myths and legends, and humor. No matter what genre, the author should first and foremost tell a good story that is well plotted, character-driven, and has a satisfying conclusion.

Folk tales, myths, and legends, especially lesser known ones from non-Western cultures, are always welcome in CRICKET. Retold tales need to be re-imagined with the same liveliness and detail of character as original stories. Please include a bibliography of sources for retold tales.

Sci-fi and fantasy manuscripts, besides being clever and imaginative, should tell a solid story with well-drawn characters. Stories featuring adventurous main characters in the age-range of CRICKET readers are most likely to succeed. CRICKET is enthusiastic about sci-fi and fantasy with a human touch, but is not a venue for excessively dystopian or warlike fantasy stories.

Historical fiction, a mainstay of CRICKET, should recreate a world accurately but with a primary focus on an energetic plot and robust characters. While modern kids no longer attend one-room schoolhouses, plow fields, or resist Roman invasions, your story should transport them across the historical divide to identify with timeless challenges of growing up and taking on responsibilities.

Contemporary realistic fiction may be light-hearted or serious. Stories typically feature lively and sympathetic main characters within the age range of our subscribers. Protagonists tend to be curious and sincere, functioning mainly within a kid’s world as they struggle to find a path through the sometimes-hilarious challenges of everyday life.

Keep in mind that CRICKET is aimed at middle-grade readers, a somewhat more protected stage than young adult. Innocent romance is welcome, but not sexual situations. Families in CRICKET can reflect the realities of contemporary life (e.g., latchkey kids, divorced parents) but not seriously disturbing situations or abuse.

CRICKET readers want to read about characters who are actively meeting their own challenges – not passively relying on the intervention of adults to solve problems of friends, family, and school. Even if not fully successful, characters in CRICKET at least progress in coming to terms with themselves and life.

Tips: A story should be a fully realized sequence of scenes and action – not just a sketch or vignette or image – with tension and dynamism between characters. Most CRICKET stories present a balance of dialogue and description. Dialogue should be natural and interesting, and avoid speechifying. Stories should “show, not tell” – that is, present scenes and reveal character through dialogue and action, not summary narration.

Stories giving our mostly American audience insight into diverse cultures are especially welcome.

Length: Most CRICKET stories are 1200–1800 words in length; however, we occasionally serialize compelling longer stories of up to 6,000 words. Submissions above this length will not be read. Authors of longer works are encouraged to submit excerpts, provided that these excerpts are under 6,000 words. We also need shorter pieces of 600–900 words.

Nonfiction

CRICKET publishes thought-provoking nonfiction articles on a wide range of subjects: history, biography, true adventure, science and technology, sports, inventors and explorers, architecture and engineering, archaeology, dance, music, theater, and art. Articles should be carefully researched and include a solid bibliography that shows that research has gone beyond reviewing websites.

Tips: Unlike a textbook or encyclopedia, CRICKET articles humanize history and discovery by telling a story clarifying how inventors and pioneers solved their problems and overcame difficulties. Including childhood anecdotes often helps our readers identify with people of great accomplishment.

Length: 1200–1800 words

Poetry

CRICKET publishes both serious and humorous poetry. Poems should be well-crafted, with precise and vivid language and images. Poems can explore a variety of themes, from nature, to family and friendships, to whatever you can imagine that will delight our readers and invite their wonder and emotional response.

Tips: Keep in mind that CRICKET is for pre-teen and early teens, young but thoughtful, curious readers. Poetry should feel contemporary, never singsong or moralizing.

Length: Most CRICKET poems are 8–15 lines, but can be as short as 3 lines or up to 35 lines. Please submit no more than 6 poems at a time.

Puzzles, Crafts, Activities

CRICKET readers enjoy logic and math puzzles, crafts, recipes, science experiments, as well as games and activities from different historical times and cultures.

Guidelines

Before submitting, be sure to familiarize yourself with our magazines. (Sample copies are available for viewing at the Cricket Media Store, or you can order a current issue by calling 800-821-0115.) Issues are also available at many local libraries. BABYBUG, LADYBUG, SPIDER, CICADA, and CRICKET do not distribute theme lists for upcoming issues.

Procedure

  • We only accept online submissions, and the Submittable page you’re currently on is the only place we accept them. We do not accept hard-copy submissions or email submissions. Please submit online via Submittable. Submittable accepts international submissions.
  • Please do not email submissions to editors or Customer Service.

Cricket Media’s literary magazines (BABYBUG, LADYBUG, SPIDER, CRICKET, and CICADA) will consider all manuscripts that are sent on speculation. We do not accept queries. Please submit a complete manuscript. (Manuscript should be submitted as a .doc, .docx, .txt, or .rtf file.) Fiction and nonfiction manuscripts should include an exact word count; poetry manuscripts should include an exact line count. Include full contact information: phone, email, and mailing address.

Please allow up to 3–6 months response time.

Questions may be directed to our email at submissions@cricketmedia.com.

Create Your Account

Have An Account? Sign In

 

What Happens Next?

The Manuscript Review Process

  • After manuscripts are received, they are reviewed by first readers. First readers consider each submission’s literary potential and whether it might be a good fit for one of our magazines.
  • Promising submissions are then carefully reviewed by several editors, including the magazine’s editor.
  • The magazine editor makes a final decision on whether to reject or accept the manuscript. For manuscripts that show some promise but need further development, the editor may write the author to request revisions on speculation.

After Acceptance

  • If we accept your manuscript, we will send you an acceptance letter detailing payment and rights information and any revisions we would like you to make (which acceptance shall only be binding upon your signing a final agreement that embodies agreed-upon rights and terms).
  • Once we’ve received your revisions, we carefully line edit the manuscript. The manuscript is then returned for your review. We work closely with our writers to bring out the best in each story, essay, and poem.
  • Once the manuscript is edited, it will be kept on file until it is assigned to an issue. Because we work 6–8 months ahead of each issue, it can be a year or more before a manuscript is placed.

Rights

  • Stories and poems previously unpublished: Rights vary.
  • Stories and poems previously published: LADYBUG purchases second publication rights. Fees vary, but are generally less than fees for first publication rights.

Rates

  • Stories and articles: up to 25¢ per word
  • Poems: up to $3.00 per line; $25.00 minimum

Art Submissions

Illustrations are by assignment only.

Before submitting, be sure to familiarize yourself with our magazines.  Sample copies are available for viewing at the Cricket Media Store where you can also purchase a current issue. Issues are also available at many local libraries.

PLEASE DO NOT send original artwork. Send postcards, promotional brochures, or color photocopies. Be sure that each sample is marked with your name, address, phone number and website or blog. Art submissions will not be returned.

Please do not submit multiple copies of samples. All samples are reviewed by the design department for all of our magazines.

We do not accept photography.

BABYBUG, LADYBUG, SPIDER, CRICKET, CLICK, ASK, MUSE, FACES, DIG, and COBBLESTONE

Please address all portfolio samples to:

Art Submissions Coordinator

Cricket Media

70 East Lake Street, Suite 800

Chicago, IL 60601

Permissions Information

For commissioned artwork, our magazines purchase print and digital rights plus promotional rights.

Physical art remains the property of the illustrator.

Create Your Account

Have An Account? Sign In

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 11, 2019

Book Giveaway: GOODNIGHT WIND by Linda Elovitz Marshall

Linda Marshall has a new picture book titled, GOODNIGHT WIND and illustrated by Maëlle Doliveux. Linda has agreed to share a book with one lucky winner.

All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Linda!

BOOK’S DESCRIPTION:

When the exhausted winter wind throws a snowy tantrum, it finds comfort in the friendship of two young children in this lyrical retelling of a Yiddish folktale illustrated with stunning collage.

In this retelling of a Yiddish folktale, “Winter Wind worked hard all season long / blowing away leaves, / preparing trees for coats of snow and ice.” Now, Wind is tired and needs a place to rest. But no one wants to shelter so cold and blustery a Wind–not the townspeople, not the country innkeeper, not even the gnarled tree who is worried about frozen roots. Finally, Wind does what any of us do when we are overtired: Wind has a tantrum. And it is only with the help of two small children brave enough to weather the storm that Wind finally finds the perfect place to sleep. Gentle language coupled with intricate photo-illustrations of collage dioramas tell this sweet tale about empathy and friendship. The visuals in this book are striking for their vibrancy, palette, and movement.

BOOK’S JOURNEY:

I was taking a course in Yiddish Children’s Literature given by Professor Miriam Udel at the YIVO organization in NYC when I first encountered this beautiful story. It was written in Yiddish by Moyshe Kulbak and first published in 1921 in what is now Vilnius, Lithuania. After translating it into English, Professor Udel shared it with her students in New York City. I was struck by the sensitive way that the natural world was depicted. I asked Professor Udel for permission to rewrite the story as a picture book for contemporary American children.

In retelling the story, there was a lot I told differently. First, I decided to have children be the “heroes” in the story. In the Yiddish version, a mother scolds the Wind for scaring her children until, at last, Wind decides to settle down. I chose to modernize the story so the frightened children realize that Wind is tired … and needs a nap. So…I added active, thoughtful, kind children to the story.

Next, I considered gender. In the Yiddish version, Wind is portrayed as male. Yet, in American folklore, wind is both male and female (“…way out west, they’ve got a name/for rain and wind and fire…and they call the wind Mariah….”). What to do? A strong, fatherly wind? A sirocco wind? A gentle, soothing, feminine wind? In the end, I decided to keep Wind gender-neutral. That meant writing the book without using pronouns. A complicated task, but a fun challenge!

Third, just as my manuscript was about to make the rounds of publishing, I discovered that someone else (Sheldon Oberman) had already told a similar story in The Wind that Wanted to Rest. At least that meant there was a market for the story! But was there a market for two such stories? And where did the other story originate? Searching for clues, I contacted folklore expert Peninnah Schramm who wrote the afterword in Oberman’s story. She didn’t know where he got the story. And Sheldon Oberman couldn’t tell me. He had passed away … and his wife had brought the story into book form as part of his legacy – it was a story he’d often told and his wife wanted it preserved for future generations. Meanwhile, Professor Udel hadn’t encountered the story in anything but the original Yiddish. Concluding that both stories may have had a common origin and that common origin was blowing in the proverbial wind, I proceeded to adapt my version in the way that storytellers have done through the ages…I made even more differences!

I made the children kinder. I had them lead Wind to an ice cave (based on an actual ice cave in Stockbridge, MA). I had Wind work harder to make Winter fun for children. And I had the seasons continue to go ‘round and ‘round so that, at the end of the book, the story begins again.

In the end, this short book is about so many things: nature and our need to care for it, human emotions like anger and frustration; it’s about the need to take a nap once in a while; and, in many ways, it’s about homelessness…and the anxiety of not knowing where there’s a safe place to rest.

I’m so happy with this book and with the absolutely beautiful illustrations by paper cut artist Maëlle Doliveux.

I think we have a lot to learn from these children … and from this story.

I’m so thankful to Professor Udel for translating Moyshe Kulbak’s words from Yiddish to English, to YIVO for offering this course on Yiddish Children’s Literature, to the whole team at Holiday House, to Maëlle Doliveux for her beautiful illustrations, and to my hardworking, wonderful agent, Christa Heschke of McIntosh & Otis for helping to guide me on this journey. And, of course, thank you, Kathy Temean, for sharing this with all of your followers. Much appreciated!

LINDA’S BIO:

I have always loved words. My parents said I spoke in full sentences before I was a year old. They also said I didn’t walk until I was two.

I was still a baby when I saw a TV commercial about a vacuum cleaner and its expandable bag. That night, my parents begged me to eat “just one more bite.” I refused. Using a phrase I’d learned from the vacuum cleaner commercial, I explained, “My stomach is fully expanded.” My parents laughed…and I was saved from having to eat that dreadful “one more bite.”

My love of words extended to foreign languages. I was one of those kids who loved school. I loved Hebrew school, too. Learning Hebrew taught me that words can be composed of roots and that those roots can change, often in predictable ways. I noticed some of the rules I’d learned in Hebrew applied to English, too. I also love word games, puzzles, and etymology, learning about the origins of words.

Some of my other favorite things include being outside, exploring, and being around animals. When I was a child, I wanted a horse. I didn’t get one. But when I grew up, my husband and I moved to a farm. That’s where we raised our four children…and sheep, chickens, and rabbits. It’s also where some of my stories are based.

I also love teaching and have taught all ages, from babies through college. I’ve taught parents, too.

When I write stories, I combine so many of the things I love. I’m always learning and exploring…and having a fabulous time! For more information, please visit my website: www.lindamarshall.com

Maëlle Doliveux’s BIO:

Maëlle is a French and Swiss illustrator who has lived all over the world, from New Jersey to New Zealand. She obtained a Bachelor’s degree in Architecture from the University of Nottingham in 2008, and graduated from the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program at the School of Visual Arts in 2013. In her spare time she enjoys chess-boxing, loose-rope walking, and making up fake hobbies for herself in her biographies.

She is also the co-founder, along with editor Josh O’Neill, of Beehive Books – a boutique publishing company focused on comics and illustration. She is the company’s creative director and in-house designer.

Thank you, Linda for sharing your book and journey with us. Maëlle’s paper cut-out illustrations really make this Yiddish folktale sing.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 10, 2019

Agent Claire Draper – Inkwell Management

I joined InkWell Management in June 2016, after studying Queer Diversity in Children’s Literature at NYU Gallatin. Diversity matters to me in a big way, especially if it’s an own voices work. I am interested in representing young adult, middle grade, picture books, graphic novels, or a feminist memoir/collection of essays. I am looking for stories with happy endings; no unnecessary deaths, violence, or darkness. I am incredibly interested in stories with a character having mental health as part of their identity, but not part of their story arc. I want a kid with bipolar disorder fighting crime but the mental health aspect isn’t the reason for the story. Otherwise it’s just a bit too dark for my tastes and a bit triggering.

I’m craving more YA queer romances with much more going on than the romance, like lesbian witches avoiding persecution, or your everyday trans crime-fighting teen, though both characters in the relationship need to be lovable for their own reasons, so please make sure your characters are as lovable as we want them to be. I love twists and turns in my books, so please surprise me. Again, I’m very much looking for YA books that handle mental illness well.

I lean more towards action, adventure, romance, fantasy, and sci-fi, and don’t love thrillers and mysteries in YA, but I am definitely looking for middle grade mysteries, especially a good detective story.

Fiction: Action/Adventure, Children’s, Family Saga, Fantasy, Graphic Novel, LGBTQ, Middle Grade, Picture Books, Romance, Science Fiction, Young Adult
Non-Fiction: LGBTQ, Memoir

Submission Guidelines
Submissions should be emailed to submissions@inkwellmanagement.com
Queries should be emailed to: submissions@inkwellmanagement.com

In the body of your email, please include a query letter and a short writing sample (1-2 chapters), and address the email to me either at the beginning of the e-mail, or put it at my attention in the subject line.

I’m behind on my reading so though our website says 1-2 months, it’s closer to 2-3 months for now.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 9, 2019

BOOK GIVEAWAY: BUBBLE WRAP GIRL by Kari van Wakeren

Kari van Wakeren has a picture book, BUBBLE WRAP GIRL. It is illustrated by CA Nobens. They have agreed to share a book with one lucky winner. All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Kari and Cheryl!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Once upon a time a little girl asked her mom for a Band-Aid. She often got hurt and her mom asked her if she should wrap her in bubble wrap.  She told her mom No! but that day inspired a woman named Kari to write a book that would encourage her children and children everywhere that they could do hard and great things—no matter the bumps and bruises they experienced in life.

In her sensitive and endearing read, Kari van Wakeren introduces readers to a little girl who is tired of getting hurt. No matter what Izzy does: climbing on the play set, playing games, playing soccer, she would get hurt. She would hurt her funny bone, stub her toe, hurt herself slipping on the grass. So finally, her parents had the idea to wrap her in bubble wrap. Although the accidents stopped, life got harder.  She couldn’t play soccer as well, ride her bike as fast, or throw food as far to the ducks in the park.

Will Izzy continue to cover herself with bubble wrap or will she learn a valuable life lesson to get up, brush yourself off, and start all over again?

According to van Wakeren, the message of Bubble Wrap Girl is also for parents as they send their kids to school or out into the world.

“As much as we might want to ‘wrap them up in bubble wrap’ and prevent them from getting hurt, it’s so much more important to give them tools to help them find the strength within them to overcome obstacles, take (appropriate) risks, and be confident in who they are so they can be vulnerable and learn from their mistakes rather than sit on the sidelines of life because they might get hurt.”

 

BOOK JOURNEY:

Bubble Wrap Girl is about a girl named Izzy Magee, who gets hurt doing lots of things she enjoys. Like most kids, she doesn’t like getting hurt, so one day, her parents wrap her up in bubble wrap. While wrapped in bubble wrap, Izzy doesn’t get hurt as often, but she realizes she can’t do the things she likes to do either. Eventually, she decides that having fun and trying new things is better than trying not to get hurt.

The book was inspired by my daughter when she was four years old. She often got hurt, and one day, when she came asking for another bandaid, I asked her if I should just wrap her up in bubble wrap. She immediately said no, but I knew a story had been born. I wrote it to encourage her, my son, and kids everywhere that they could do hard and great things, no matter what bumps and bruises they experience in life.

I wrote this story to encourage kids to try new things, be brave, and to show them that they can do hard and great things. It’s a story that celebrates resilience and the inner-greatness that is inherent in each of us. I want all kids -regardless of who they are, where they come from, or what their situation is at home- to hear this message. It’s my hope that it’s one that they will remember and that will sustain them as they face things like mean girls, put downs, being cut from a team, moving to a new school, or feeling like they don’t fit in.

As I tell kids whenever I have the chance to share Bubble Wrap Girl with them, bumps and bruises of all kinds will happen as we journey through life. But we each have what it takes within us to bounce back, keep on going, and do great things. Sometimes, that great thing may be trying a new activity. Sometimes it may mean standing up to a bully or doing what’s right, rather than easy. And sometimes it will mean believing in yourself enough to let your light shine, not giving in when others try to subdue it.

Although I had the idea in my head for awhile before I finally put pen to paper while on a flight several years ago. After that, I tweaked the manuscript a bit, and I spent a lot of time researching my publishing options.

As I was trying to find a publisher, I explored several publishing companies. Through my research, I learned that most traditional publishers only work with authors who have an agent. There are many online options for self-publishing, but some of them felt more like a sales pitch than someone to work with, and others used computer generated images for illustrations. For me, the illustrations are key in a children’s book, so I didn’t want them to be glorified clip-art.

I decided to work with Beaver’s Pond Press in Edina, MN, because of a good recommendation, and because I could meet with them in person throughout the process. They were great to work with, and it was through BPP that I met the illustrator, CA Nobens. Throughout the process, my vision for Bubble Wrap Girl was honored, which meant a lot to me.

Something that I didn’t expect when I embarked on this journey was how writing and publishing this book has been so much more than accomplishing one of my life goals. It is a dream come true for me, but even more than that, it is an example in and of itself to our kids of using your gifts, chasing your dreams, and following your heart.

My daughter, who at first didn’t want the book to be about her, has been able to go with me to some school visits and interviews. Having her experience this process with me first-hand has been an amazing opportunity for her. Throughout the whole process, both she and our son have seen their mom push herself to do new things and to be brave, which is an invaluable lesson and exactly what Bubble Wrap Girl is about.

Bubble Wrap Girl is for sale on my website, http://www.karivanwakeren.com, itascabooks.com, Amazon and barnesandnoble.com. It can also be ordered at your local bookstore. I work with a warehouse called Itasca Books for distribution and because of this partnership, bookstores and libraries can order Bubble Wrap Girl through Ingram.

KARI’S BIO:

Kari is an avid reader and working mother of two joy-filled kids. She lives in central Minnesota with her family, where together they enjoy music, playing outside, sharing time with friends, and being silly. She works as a pastor and is passionate about helping kids realize their inherent self-worth and inner strength. When she is not reading or writing, Kari can usually be found in her garden, on a walk, or cooking up something delicious. She is a graduate of the University of Minnesota-Duluth and Luther Seminary.

About Illustrator CA Nobens

Little CA Nobens, the shortest kid in her kindergarten class, shot up like a weed in first grade. She didn’t know where her head or her knees or her elbows began or ended, until she was the tallest girl in eighth grade. She was always clonking her noggin or stubbing her toe or rapping her wrist or barking some bone on something. She could have used miles and miles of bubble wrap! Not having any, she just tried to stay still and draw pictures a lot.

 

Thank you Kari and Cheryl for sharing your book and journey with us. Very cute book and illustrations.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 8, 2019

NJSCBWI ART SHOW

Last weekend the New Jersey SCBWI had their annual conference. One of the highlights of the conference every year is the ARTISTS SHOWCASE. The photo above shows the winners on stage being recognized and receiving their awards. There were three award categories: Published; Unpublished and the Members Choice Award. Here were the instructions:

“You have been my friend. That in itself is a tremendous thing.” – EB White, Charlotte’s Web

Assignment is to create an illustration capturing the essence of the above quote. Please do not give us a reimagining of Charlotte’s Web. We want you to interpret this text in your own way with your own characters, in your own style.

CATHLEEN DANIELS: Winner of both Published and Member’s Choice Award –
Featured on Illustrator Saturday. Website: www.cathleendaniels.com

JULIA MILLS: Honorable Mention Winner in the Published Category www.jamills.com

GUY OLIVIERI: Member’s Choice Award Runner up. www.privateerart.com – Twitter.com/PrivateerArt 


SIBU T.P.: Winner in the Unpublished Category. 
Website: sibudraws.com

ANNE APPERT: Winner of Honorable Mention: Unpublished – Featured on Illustrator Saturday. Website: www.anneappert.com

KATIA BULBENKO: www.katiab.net


NIVANA CHHABRIA

DEBORAH CUNEO:
Website:www.deborahcuneoillustration.com Blog:deborahcuneo.blogspot.com

DIANA DELOSH: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. Website: http://dianadelosh.com/

LORRAINE DEY: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. Website: http://www.lorrainedey.com http://www.Deystudio.com

BARBARA DILORENZO: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. Barbara’s website: www.barbaradilornezo.com.

CHRIS HARRINGTON: www.cshillustration.com @cshillustration

AMALIA HOFFMAN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. http://www.amaliahoffman.com

LAURA JUNE: Twitter:  @Seasidestoryshp. Website: http://www.SeasideStoryshoppe.com

STARR KOPPER: Website: www.starrkopper.com Title: Come In out of the cold my Dear

COLLEEN KOSINSKI: Featured on Illustrator Saturday Colleen’s website: https://colleenrowankosinski.com/

ESTELLA MORGAN: www.estellamorgan.com


FRANCESCA PICONE:

NORMA RAHN: https://rahnstudio.art/

ERIC SAILER: Featured on Illustrtator Saturday. Website: www.ericsailer.com

GLEN VIGGIANO: Title: Yakub and Fernando Glen’s website: www.glenviggiano.com Instagram and Twitter: @glenviggi

LAURA WERTKIN:

Hope you enjoyed looking at the artwork presented in the New Jersey SCBWI Artist Showcase. Thanks to Barbara Dilorenzo for stepping up and taking over the job as Illustrator Coordinator for the New Jersey chapter. Barbara did a great job. 

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | June 7, 2019

June Agent of the Month – Connor Eck

I’m delighted to introduce Connor Eck, an agent with Lucinda Literary who is actively building an eclectic list in the children’s genre. He is June’s AGENT OF THE MONTH.

CONNOR ECK – AGENT AT LUCINDA LITERARY:

Connor Eck represents adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction, picture books, memoir, business, sports, and narrative nonfiction. Connor looks for fresh voices, unforgettable characters, tightly constructed plot, and thematic storytelling. In nonfiction, he is drawn to powerful narratives that challenge the status quo or ask big questions, original thinkers, and authors with strong platforms.

A sample of books Connor has represented include: YOU BE MOMMY, a picture book in which a tuckered out mother asks her child to “be mommy” at bedtime, and the sequel YOU BE DADDY (Macmillan); BE STRAIGHT WITH ME, a young adult book-in-verse exploring how the author and her male gay best friend unexpectedly fell in love in college (Andrews McMeel); LIFE IS SHORT & SO AM I, the memoir of a little person’s improbable journey to, through, and beyond WWE (ECW Press).

Connor has a passion for writing, nurturing literary talent, and for bolstering the careers of his fellow writers. He received his Bachelor of Arts in English from Union College. To query Connor directly, email connor@lucindaliterary.com

Here is more about Lucinda Literary:

Lucinda Literary is one of very few hybrid literary, marketing, and lecture agencies for authors. We represent books across categories, but specialize in “ideas” or “big think” books that look to change the way people work, behave, and live. Most often, our clients come to us already well-known in their fields as original thinkers or voices—they are business leaders, scientists, or bring a strong media or online profile.

But sometimes, there is just a great title concept. Or a great story that requires a professional writer. We help develop books from the ground up.

Lucinda Literary selectively represents fiction. We primarily look for voice-driven, emotionally raw, and often unconventionally told novels for adults and young adults. In children’s books, we look for stories that transport us and break new ground, much in the way our adult books do.

Bringing a background in marketing, and publicity relationships to every project we represent, we are strategists and advocates not just for the books, but for the entire careers, of our authors. We do not take on a high volume of clients by design, which allows us to be hands-on, attentive, and editorially invested.

Lucinda Literary has worked with all of the major publishers and more, including:

  • PenguinRandomHouse
  • HarperCollins
  • Simon & Schuster
  • Hachette Book Group
  • Macmillan
  • Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Hay House
  • McGraw-Hill
  • Scholastic
  • Amazon

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR JUNE 2019 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “JUNE FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE” Example: Paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it’s a picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED! Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.

Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: June 20th.

RESULTS: June 28th.

CHECK BACK NEXT FRIDAY FOR PART ONE OF MY INTERVIEW WITH CONNOR.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Older Posts »

Categories

%d bloggers like this: