Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 23, 2019

Illustrator Saturday – Khoa Le

Khoa Le is a freelance illustrator, graphic designer, and painter based in Vietnam. She describes her work as whimsical, dark, yet vibrant and combines traditional and digital processes to create her final pieces. Based in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, Khoa is the author and illustrator of numerous picture books. In addition to her work in publishing, she has a few other side jobs such as graphic designer and painter. As a painter, she has participated in several groups and 2 solo exhibitions, in Vietnam and other Asian countries. Khoa is also a proud mom of 5 cats.

Her work can be described as whimsical, dreamy and with a bit of fantasy. She loves details and can draw a mean line-art, so if she was not an illustrator, she would probably be a tattoo artist.

She is the winner of the Grand Prize Samsung KidsTime Authors Award 2015 (Singapore) and the second runner up of The Scholastic Picture Book Award 2017 (Singapore). Khoa also has a passion for travel, an eagerness to learn about different cultures, and a desire to discover the beauty of the world.

HERE IS KHOA DISCUSSING HER PROCESS:

I worked mostly with digital medium. but I make textures with traditional medium such as watercolor, oil color, and also taking pictures of nature’s texture to add in and creating a “traditional” feeling to the paintings. I also creates digital brush myself playing with those textures files.

Sketch

Put some shading and some text so client can understand generally how it would look

More detail sketching

Full color final Illustration

Interview with Khoa Le: 

How long have you been illustrating?

I think more than 10 years.

What and when was the first painting or illustration that you did where someone paid you for your artwork?

It was a short story book that got published in Vietnam.

Have you always lived in Vietnam?

Yes, I do.

What art university did you attend to major in graphic design?

I went to Ho Chi Minh Fine Art University and graduated with major in graphic design, but regarding to illustration, I would say I’m a self-taught.

Did the school help you find illustration work?

Somewhat. Even my major is graphic design, we still got many fine art related subjects like any fine art student. That helps me put the artistic side in my illustration.

Do you feel art school influenced your illustrating style?

I am not sure. When I was younger I had a lots of favourite artists. I think all of them influence me in someway.

How many picture books have you illustrated?

I cannot remember, probably a lot.  I was somewhat well-known illustrator in Vietnam before I get contracts from other countries.

What was the title of your first published book?

— I don’t remember, it was quite long ago. It was not a very important book/ writer, but I was grateful the editor gave me, a completely new artist, an opportunity to start a career as an illustrator. Definitely gave me some boost received my first payment from illustration work, even though it’s a very small pay.

How did you get that contract?

Through a senior journalist, she knew me through a comic series I had worked for a teenager magazine, then introduce me to the publisher.

What type of illustrating were you doing before illustrating your first book?

I did some comics, some artwork/illustration for myself. I’ve been drawing/painting my whole life. Since I was 3-4 years old, I always have my freetime doodling.

Did you work with any art directors or editors located in the US when you illustrated The Boy Who Cried for Simon & Schuster at their imprint Insight?

No, I did not. The book was published in Italian and French before that, and Insight just bought the right to publish it in English.

Have you written and illustrated a book of your own?

Yes, many. Actually, “The Boy Who Cried” you mentioned above is one of them.

What is your latest book?

The lastest book I’ve written and illustrated called “The mysterious princesses”, also published in Italian and French.

How long have you been making a living from doing freelance illustrating?

Since my 1st book I illustrated ever. I maintain my main job as graphic designer at a publisher while manage doing freelance illustration.

I notice that many of your books are published in languages other than English. Do you know how many different languages have been used with the books you have illustrated?

I think a few, French, Italian, Polish, Spanish, Russian, Chinese.

I see you are represented by Astound. How did you connect with them and how long have they been representing you?

They found me! I have a few portfolio online, one very active is Behence, I think they found me through one of those artist portfolio. They contacted me, through some discussion and consideration I decided to be represented by them. I think it’s been 2 years.

It looks like you might have done a few CD covers. Is that correct? If so, how many have you done and how did they find you?

— Yes, CD cover are very fun to make. As I’m also very much into music, doing CD cover is just one of the most interesting illustration I got the chance to get into. Most of the artists contacted me are young/ new up-coming. I think they also found me somewhere in the internet.


Have you done any book covers?

A lot!

Do you get most of your commissioned work from exhibiting?

Not much. My exhibition was mostly my private artwork/collection. It does not have much to do with my illustration work.

Would you illustrate a book for an author who wants to self-publish?

I would. I’m not the one to choose thing based on prestige or anything. If the story and idea is my thing, and the timing allows me, that would be no problem.

Have you worked with educational publishers? Which ones?

Yes, I do: Learning AZ

Have you done any illustrating for children’s magazines? Which ones?

Yes, Benchmark.

Have you ever thought about illustrating a wordless picture book?

That would be a great idea.

What do you think is your biggest success?

I don’t think I have any big success yet. There’s still many things I want to do.

What is your favorite medium to use?

I started with traditional medium and move forward to digital medium. But still I’d like to combine traditional with digital. Nowadays I work mostly in digital.

Do you own or have you used a Graphic Drawing Tablet when illustrating?

I have a few, they are all from Wacom.

Do you try to spend a specific amount of time working on your craft?

I think all the work I’ve done somehow makes me getting better on my craft, days by days.

Do you take pictures or research a project before you start?

Definitely!

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

Yes, it’s true. Thanks to internet, not just me, but also many illustrators out there can connect to publishers/editors world wide.

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

I don’t think ahead and set myself any big goals. Every illustration job I get can be such a joy to work on and I just concentrate on enjoying that, one thing at a time.

What are you working on now?

I have a couple of illustration projects, and one book written/illustrated by myself.

Do you have any material type tips you can share with us? Example: Paint or paper that you love – the best place to buy – a new product that you’ve tried – A how to tip, etc.

I think it varied for all artists, and anything you feel comfortable working on, than it’s good for you.

Any words of wisdom on how to become a successful writer or illustrator?

Keep working and find joy in doing so.

Thank you Kayla for sharing your talent and expertise with us. Make sure you share you future successes with us. To see more of Khoa’s work, you can visit her at: Website: http://khoale.daportfolio.com/

If you have a minute, please leave a comment for Khoa. I am sure she’d love to hear from you and I enjoy reading them, too.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

I am happy to announce that Dawn Frederick, owner of Red Sofa Literary is February’s Agent of the Month.

Submission Guideline for a chance to get a first page Critiqued by Dawn is at the bottom of this post.

Red Sofa Literary

Dawn Michelle Frederick is the owner/literary agent of Red Sofa Literary, established in 2008. She brings a broad knowledge of the book business to the table, bringing multiple years of experience as a bookseller in independent, chain, and specialty stores; sales, marketing, and book development experience; previously a literary agent at Sebastian Literary Agency. She has a B.S. in Human Ecology, and a M.S. in Information Sciences. Dawn co-founded the MN Publishing Tweet Up, is the current President of the Twin Cities Advisory Council for MPR, and a teaching artist at Loft Literary. You can find her on Twitter at @redsofaliterary.

· Biography-Historical, media-related, political—ABSOLUTELY NO PERSONAL MEMOIRS
· Creative Nonfiction — It needs to be smart, with noticeable platform, and commercial. I enjoy a wide range of topics.
· History – Books that will engage the commerical reader.  ex:I listen to a LOT of MPR and NPR (all the shows, most of the podcasts)
· Humor – I love a good laugh (I represent the CHOOSE YOUR OWN MISERY series)
· Pop Culture – Especially Americana, and anything quirky
· Social Issues/Current Affairs—Women’s Studies, GLTB Studies, Social Sciences, and more.
· Sports — Less mainstream, more extreme sport, ex: Roller Derby, not so much into traditional sports
· Women’s Narratives – women’s nonfiction, diverse stories please!
· Young Adult – Fiction, Nonfiction
· Middle Grade – Fiction, Nonfiction

HERE IS WHAT DAWN IS LOOKING FOR:

A some craft books that pop culture themed – think Joss Whedon, OITNB, Boardwalk Empire.  Odd, offbeat, fun.

A CYOA (choose-your-own adventure) Graphic Novel (4 yrs in a row of asking for this)

More extreme sports YA novels for both genders.

More GLBT novels, with diversity, but also a little more light-hearted too.

More geek, all the time, for YA and MG novels and nonfiction

I generally want books that I can emotionally connect with, that go back to the teenage Dawn who was equally eclectic then, and books that have dark, contemporary themes for both fiction and nonfiction.  Nothing didactic, overly sappy, or overly boring.  No memoirs, no vampires, no mermaids, no wolves, you name it. But give me a good robot book, or gamer story and I’ll be turning the pages. And last but not least, a roller derby middle grade novel would made my derby heart really happy.

Submission Guidelines

We highly encourage everyone to send an email and/or query letter initially, before attempting to send a full book proposal or sample chapters. If there is an interest, we will directly contact the author. Once these materials are received, there is usually response time of 4-6 weeks, sometimes sooner.

If querying via email, please only put the contents of your query IN the email. We will not open attachments unless they have been requested in advance.

Dawn’s email: dawn@redsofaliterary.com

We highly encourage everyone to email a query initially, before attempting to send a full book proposal or sample chapters. If there is an interest, we will directly contact the author. Once these materials are received, there is usually response time of 2-3 months if it’s the Fall/Spring/Winter, this will depend with our individual conference schedules and commitments to our current authors.

Materials to have ready, should we request your book:
1. The full ms (should we request a partial or the full ms)
2. A full book proposal with Author Bio, Competition, Market (WHO will read the book), Promotion (HOW readers will learn about the book), Chapter Summaries (for non-fiction), and a Synopsis/Overview.
3. Sample chapters (if nonfiction)
4. Sample artwork (if a graphic novel)

HERE IS PART TWO OF MY INTERVIEW WITH DAWN:

  1. Do you let people know if you are not interested?

 

If the person ignores my categories, it’s an automatic pass. Rejections happen, but they are never personal. If it’s a mass email query, no response.

 

  1. How long does it usually take to respond to requested material? And query letters?

 

I can’t speak for all agents out there, but it’s now taking 2-3 months for me to respond to queries, and averaging 2-4 months if I request to see materials. I’m now requesting less, as I do have a full roster of awesome authors, so thankfully it’s more manageable now that I’m not taking submissions as often during the calendar year. (I will always take pitches at conferences)

 

  1. Have you noticed any common mistakes that writers make?

 

Besides the general grammatical errors that are to be expected, generally some authors will try to rush the process and/or send out the book before it’s ready for agent/editor eyes.  A good idea can’t be rushed, and taking the time to fine-tune one’s idea is a good idea.

  1. Do you give editorial feedback to your clients? 

 

Off course, that is what one’s agent is supposed to do.

  1. If you receive something you think is good, but not for you, would you ask another agent working for you to take a look?

 

Depends on the idea, generally I am going to try to avoid sending books to other agents, as I don’t want to accidentally send them something they don’t want necessarily. Of course, I’ll encourage the person to query other agents, but if someone at my agency seems to be a good fit, we’ll have a conversation internally about the idea.

 

  1. How many editors do you go to before giving up on a manuscript?

 

Not a set #, varies with the type of book and how editors are responding. If they are wanting a revise/resubmit, it means there’s a good idea but it’s not ready yet.  I personally will never just take something to a small # of editors and then state it’s done.

  1. What happens if you don’t sell a book?

 

We discuss why the book didn’t sell. A conversation will be had regarding the potential revisions, or perhaps we’ll shelve the book and take out a newer/fresher idea.

  1. What do you think of digital books?

 

They are just another format, and some people prefer ebooks over print. It’s no big deal to me either way, it’s more about the fact that people actually read the books 😉

  1. Have you noticed any new trends building in the industry?

 

There are always trends, don’t write to a trend. 😉  Write the best book you can write.

  1. Any words of wisdom on how a writer can improve their writing, get an agent, and get published?

 

I believe you’ve more than covered it with these questions. J I would say not to rush the process, enjoy every step, don’t feel like this is high-speed race. Publishing takes time.

 

  1. Would you like to be invited to other writer’s retreats, workshops, and conferences?

 

Always!  I honestly love teaching and speaking at conferences, getting to meet the writers face-to-face. We all spend lots of screen time sans actual interactions nowadays, it’s all about the genuine conversations as far as I’m concerned.

CHECK BACK NEXT FRIDAY FOR FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES DAWN.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 21, 2019

BOOK GIVEAWAY: CAVEKID BIRTHDAY by Cathy Breisacher

Author Cathy Breisacher has a new picture book titled, CAVEKID BIRTHDAY. It is is hitting bookstores on March 5th. Cathy has agreed to share a book with one lucky winner. All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Cathy!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

“The message will resonate with generations of readers—the simplicity of a box combined with imagination crosses time and gender…Book Sweet.” Kirkus Reviews

Caveboy and Cvegirl are best friends and do all kinds of cavekid activities together. They also share the same birthday! They each want to find the perfect gift, but Cavekids have no money! They do, however, have something valuable that they can take to Caveman’s Collectibles to trade, but when it’s time to exchange gifts, they are in for a mammoth surprise. Not to worry! These Cavekids are resourceful, and they use their imaginations and creativity to come up with a way to have a satisfying and very happy birthday.

BOOK JOURNEY:

I’ve been writing for many years, but I really devoted myself to writing and trying to get published about six years ago when I made a career change to become a school librarian. This job affords me the luxury of immersing myself in the kidlit world. I love reading fun and silly picture books, and I enjoy coming up with new story ideas that I think will make kids smile and laugh.

The idea for Cavekid Birthday came to me in 2014. One day, during Tara Lazar’s PiBoId Mo challenge (now called STORYSTORM), I saw a clipart image of a caveboy and a cavegirl. A week before I had been thinking of a way to mash two story ideas together. I tried to think of a storyline for cavekids, and eventually thought about Christmas time. But, like all of my stories, it went through many rounds of revision. I really liked the idea of a Cavekid Christmas, but based on input from some of my writer friends, I changed Cavekid Christmas to Cavekid Birthday, thinking that selling a Christmas book right out of the gate may be more difficult to do.

I tried writing the story all in dialogue between Caveboy and Cavegirl, but the story was definitely missing something. Once I settled on a narrative with a birthday theme, it still went through a couple of dozen revisions before I started shopping it around. I submitted the story on and off for about 6 or 8 months before landing an agent, which came about after attending an SCBWI conference. With feedback from my agent, the story went through a few more tweaks before sending it out on submission. Then, less than a year later, it sold to Julie Bliven, my brilliant and wonderful editor at Charlesbridge.

With Julie’s expert editorial eye, we fine-tuned the story and then it was time to search for an illustrator. Much to my surprise and delight, they asked me to weigh in on the decision. Roland Garrigue was chosen and he is such a pro. I love the detail and color in his art. It was thrilling to see the first sketches and just as thrilling to see the final art. Working on this book could not have been a more wonderful experience. The entire process was fascinating to me, and I was included in every stage of it. It was eye-opening to see how much thought goes into every detail of a book, such as the page layout, the color of the text, and the placement of the text. It’s been a long journey but an incredibly exciting one. The story sold in 2016 and it launches this March, 2019. I enjoyed the collaboration between everyone involved, and watching the story turn into a book was absolutely magical. I hope every writer out there gets to experience the wonder of seeing your manuscript turn into a book that will be in kids’ hands someday.

CATHY’S BIO:

Cathy Breisacher spends her days surrounded by books working as an elementary school librarian. She first earned her Master’s Degree in Counselor Education and worked as a high school guidance counselor before earning her Master of Library Science Degree and making a career change.
Her passion is to write fun, silly, humorous picture books that will put a smile on kids’ faces. Her first two trade picture books are forthcoming: Cavekid Birthday (March, 2019 by Charlesbridge) and Chip and Curly, the Great Potato Race (May, 2019 by Sleeping Bear Press).

Cathy lives in Central PA with her husband, Chuck. When she is not working or writing, she enjoys reading, traveling, and spending time with her husband, family, and friends. She also likes learning about new technology or makerspace activities that she can incorporate into her libraries. She loves all kinds of parks – national parks, theme parks, and Central Park – and is happy when she gets a chance to visit any of these.
You can read more about her at https://www.cathybreisacher.com/.

Thank you Cathy for sharing your book and journey with us. The story and the illustrations are so much fun and I love the book trailer. Good Luck.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 20, 2019

Side by Side Art Workshops

Michael McFadden – Abstract Art and Doris Ettlinger – Clouds & Sky in Watercolor

Michael McFadden – Abstract Art Workshop

Center for Contemporary Art
2020 Burnt Mills Road
Bedminster, NJ 07921
908 234-2345

Click HERE to register
Saturday, March 16 (one day)
9:30 am – 2:30 pm

Students will use a variety of hands-on techniques to discover abstract forms and develop abstract compositions. While creating their own abstract art work, the instructor will discuss the history and evolution of abstract painting.

Michael McFadden
BA Carlton College
MA Purdue University
MFA University of Wisconsin
20 years teaching experience at UW – Madison, Purdue University, and Hunterdon Central High School

CCA Faculty Exhibit – Art Alliance of Monmouth County, January 2019

Riding the Thermals 6.5 x 11″

Doris Ettlinger – Clouds and Skies in Watercolor

Center for Contemporary Art
2020 Burnt Mills Road
Bedminster, NJ 07921
908 234-2345

Click HERE to register
Saturday, March 16 (one day)
9:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Give the sky center stage. Learn to paint fluffy clouds. Flood the paper with strong darks for a threatening sky. We can add a ribbon of landscape at the bottom. Or drop in an occasional bird. It’s your world.

Doris Ettlinger
BFA Rhode Island School of Design, MFA University of Wisconsin – Madison
Children’s Book Illustrator
23 years teaching experience, all levels
Coach for the Musconetcong Watercolor Group

If you are physically in the area, don’t miss the chance to work with one of these talented artists.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 19, 2019

Three Ways to Make The Historical Real

Three Ways to Make The Historical Real

By Katia Raina, debut author of Castle of Concrete, a YA novel set in the last year of the collapsing Soviet Union, about a shy Jewish girl falling in love with a boy who may be an anti-Semite. This book, forthcoming from Young Europe Books in June had a long, looong journey, about which Katia will blog here soon. 

Katia graduated from the Vermont College of Fine Arts with an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults. She is looking forward to sharing what she’s learned there in a special series here on this blog as well.

Katia started writing when she lived in New Jersey – in fact she shared the first draft of the manuscript that became her debut at a first SCBWI NJ retreat in Toms River. Now she teaches middle school in D.C., but still keeps cherishes her writing friends from Jersey.

To find out more about Katia, visit her at http://www.KatiaRaina.com.

Writing historical fiction is its own special kind of fun — and its own special challenge. The challenge of course is: how can you bring to life a world that you can’t even visit? But the fun lies in the answer: there are ways.

Way #1

Make It Personal

The life in your historical fiction story must start at its core: the story concept. Whatever tumultuous times you want to portray — and the more tumultuous the times you choose, the more potential for conflict —  you don’t want the drama of the time to be artificially superimposed onto your characters’ problems. No reader wants to feel they are reading a history textbook when picking the pages of a novel, and no writer wants to have to info-dump their facts onto the poor reader’s head. By tying your characters’ conflicts to the conflict of the time you make your readers hungry for the historical info.

For example, my novel Castle of Concrete is set in the final year of Communist Russia’s collapse, amidst intensifying nationalism and anti-Semitism. Lots of drama to go around, but I made sure the drama was directly related to my characters’ lives by making my protagonist the daughter of a Jewish anti-Communist dissident who is trying to put her life together. The conflict gets even more personal, as my protagonist, Sonya, falls deeper and deeper in love with a boy who may be an actual, passionate anti-Semite.

Exercise:

Think of the historical period that intrigues you. Brainstorm a list of people who would be hit hardest or affected most powerfully by the tensions of the time and the place.

Way #2

Make It Relevant

Connect your historical time and place to here and now. This isn’t a new idea. I picked it up from Story, an insightful writing guide by Robert McKee. “Historical drama polishes the past into a mirror of the present,” McKee writes. It’s the point of studying history, isn’t it? To understand our own selves better. In Castle of Concrete I tried to take that advice to heart. As I was writing the story about anti-Semitism, I kept making mental connections with all kinds of other “anti.” I kept thinking of other “outsiders,” in Russia and much closer to my current home than that, whom the society had pushed aside, or tried to. To be honest, I wish the topic of xenophobia and “otherness” wasn’t relevant to today. But we all know that’s not so.

Exercise:

Look at your amazing historical fiction idea. Write a list of three to five parallels one can make from it to the crazy times we live in. Then look over your list and see what you can amp up in your story. Now, you don’t want to be heavy-handed about it. Really, just keeping these connections in the back of your mind will add richness to your story and make it even more relevant. See an excerpt from Castle of Concrete below, for an example of connections between anti-Semitism and other kinds of hate. This particular part was hard to write.

“A negr—a black-skinned man—asks a genie, ‘pleaze, make me white … ”

I tune out the rest of it. When he is done, he looks at me expectantly. The laugh he wants from me stays glued to the bottom of my throat. His fingers stroking my leg do not falter.

“A bit vulgar?—All right, how about this one. A negr and a Georgian tried to trade with a Jew—”

“No.”

He lifts his hand from my thigh for a moment. I dare a small breath, realizing only now that I haven’t been breathing, trying to quiet my leg trembling under a sudden absence of touch. “I don’t want to hear any more jokes.”

Way #3

Make It Sing

Language informs thought, reflects our reality and makes us who we are. Language is the mirror to culture. So using language intentionally can be a great way for you to immerse the reader into your world. According to 19th century anthropologist Franz Boas, the Eskimo have 50 different words for “snow.” And if you read the novel Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac, then you might remember that apparently in Navajo language, the word “goodbye” does not exist at all. In your own writing, look for the odd expressions, look for the slang, ponder the rhythm that feels truest to your historical setting (for example, choppy sentences or long, winding ones?) Bring in the special expressions, the street names, the nicknames, the superstitions. It will make your world more real. Not to mention, it will make your story that much more fun to write!

Here are a few weird Russianisms and slang expressions from Castle of Concrete that I had a lot of fun translating and then infusing into my story. I tried to get in as many as possible, though a few times my editor had to ask a nicer version of, Huh?

“Interesting, who he’ll choose next, now that he has sampled practically every chiksa in Moscow Region. . . .”

“Sh-sh-sh! Shut your fountain. He’s standing right here—”

“Ey, who is this bird?”

And one more, for the road, because I just can’t stop, can I? This next one shows an interaction of a boy who is bullying and harassing Sonya. It also examines traditional Russian thinking, which is based on hierarchy and challenge to those who try to stand out from the community.

“Roll away from me,” I say.

“You know what your problem is, microbe?” His breath reeks of roasted sunflower seeds. “You don’t know your place, that’s what. You think you’re so-oh classy—” His hand brushes down the front of my shirt. “Just cause you’ve got an imported shirt and a pair of boobies?”

Exercise:

Research the slang expressions of your time period. Collect them. How about sayings or proverbs? Read poetry written during that era; watch a period movie and stop it frequently to jot down the way the characters speak. Internalize it. Listen to a song of the time. Memorize it. You never know how it can come in handy.

****

Some of these suggestions you can make a conscious effort to implement, though others you will use naturally, without trying, in the course of your brainstorming process or research. Thinking about it now, this can be a good guide for any kind of story that you write. Be it magical realism, science fiction set on a distant planet or the here and now romance, each story must provide the reader with its own unique and flavorful landscape, with which the characters lives intimately intertwine.

So, whatever genre you work in, happy writing! I can’t wait to visit your worlds on the page!


 

Thank you Katia for a great article. Looking to the next.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Author Josh Crute has a new picture book published by Page Street Kids. It is titled, OLIVER: The Second-Largest Living Thing on Earth and It is available in bookstores now. Josh has agreed to share a book with one lucky winner. All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Josh!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

This story tackles the familiar feeling of being in someone’s shadow―in a hilarious and endearing way. Readers will be able to relate to Oliver as he stretches his limbs in winter, lifts logs in spring, soaks up the sun in summer, and munches on mulch in autumn, trying to grow big enough to be noticed. Set in Sequoia National Forest, this story will appeal to national park visitors as well as kids who love nature and clever humor.

The bright and playful art brings the giant sequoias to life, and the interactions between the trees and furry forest buddies add subtle―and sometimes not-so-subtle―humor. Readers will want to join in on the fun and visit Oliver, Sherman, and all their friends in Sequoia National Forest.

BOOK JOURNEY:

I first met Oliver while on vacation with my family in Sequoia National Park. We were admiring the General Sherman Tree—famous for being the largest living thing on earth—when I noticed another sequoia, just off to the side, who wasn’t that much smaller, nor that much shorter, yet nobody seemed to notice him as they raced past to see Sherman. A character immediately popped into my mind and I began joking about him with my family. Who was he? Was he jealous next to such an illustrious neighbor? Suddenly, the first eight lines of the book popped into my head and I typed them into my phone before I could lose them…

And there they stayed for several months.

Why?

Because, at the time, I had no intention of being a picture book writer!

I was a film school graduate, living in Los Angeles, trying to make it as a writer and director. After two years of being more “starving” than “artist,” I finally reached a breaking point. I knew I wouldn’t be able to keep this lifestyle up in ten years, but my body said, “Bruh, you can’t keep this up tomorrow.” A gnarly anxiety attack put me in the hospital and forced me to change directions for good.

So what new direction would that be? I woke up after the hospital visit and took stock of my surroundings:

1) I was working in the children’s department of a bookstore, and knew it was something I enjoyed doing.

2) I had recently worked as a writing tutor for kids, and discovered I was pretty good at it.

3) My mom often said that I should write books for kids (and moms are usually right about these kind of things).

4) I had already been working on a couple of picture books (including Oliver) for fun.I decided to put movies aside and throw everything into writing children’s books. While I recuperated with my family, I wrote the rest of Oliver.

When I finished the draft, I thought it was terrible! Oh well, I thought, At least I finished it. I set it aside and moved on to new ideas. A few months later, I asked a published friend if I could get coffee with him. He was super generous and even agreed to look at a few of my manuscripts. I almost didn’t take Oliver because I thought it was so bad, but at the last second, I stuffed it into my backpack. After looking at the first couple manuscripts, he was pleasant, but not very enthusiastic. Then I said, “Wait, I’ve got one more.” He read Oliver, and the air changed. “Keep working on this one,” he insisted.

I took his advice, and a few months later, I showed it to an editor friend. She loved it and was kind enough to pass it along to some of her industry friends. It dropped onto a desk at the brand new Page Street Kids, they hired the amazing John Taesoo Kim to illustrate it and bring it to life, and here I am today, stunned and stoked that I get to do this as a career instead of making movies (I wouldn’t change it for the world). I even got to do the launch party at the bookstore I used to work at, to seats packed full of the same friends who had helped me during all the difficult moments prior! Just like Oliver, I learned it’s nice not to be alone.

JOSH’S BIO:

Josh Crute is a debut children’s book author. He was born by the bays of Maryland, grew up on the beaches of Florida, lived on the coasts of California, and now resides in the hills of Alabama. When he isn’t writing at home or making movies with his friends, you can spot him in his native habitats, the public library and local bookstore. He is smaller than most trees, but larger than most squirrels.

Thank you Josh for sharing your book and journey with us. Teachers, parents, and kids should love this book. 

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 17, 2019

Carina Press Holiday Proposals – Deadline Feb. 27th


Submission Call: Holiday 2019 Proposals

Happy 2019! Like you, the Carina Press team is only now leaving behind the rush of winter holidays … but publishing works far, far in advance. It’s time to launch our first submission call of the year: Holiday Proposals!

For publication in 2019, we’re looking for contemporary romances set against holidays that fall from October to January. Holidays celebrated by all different faiths, belief systems and cultures are included, and books do not need to be set in the United States.

While we’re still interested in Christmas novels, our aim is to read (and publish) far beyond that.

While this is a call for proposals, completed manuscripts should be planned for a minimum of 50,000 words. While we’re looking for only contemporary romances, we will accept all heat levels. As with all of our submissions calls, we welcome #ownvoices authors and authors writing inclusively, including all LGBTQ+ pairings or poly relationships.

General open proposal call submission link: https://carinapress.submittable.com/submit/75265/holiday-proposal-call-2019

Closing date: February 27, 2019 (all submissions due by 11:59pm Eastern on this date)

Requirements for this proposal call:

  • Your book must be a contemporary romance but can be of any heat level.
  • All LGBTQ+ pairings or poly relationships welcome.
  • Your proposed book must be a completely new work and not have been previously available for readers’ consumption in any form, whether self-published, posted (in its entirety; excerpts are fine) on a writing community site (example: Wattpad) or released via digital or traditional publisher. Only new material will be considered during this submission call. If you have a previously published title for consideration, please submit it via our regular submission channels.
  • You cannot submit a project you have submitted to Carina Press before.

Materials needed to participate:

  • A detailed query letter with a 3-5 paragraph book description, plus a short introduction of your writing credentials and publishing history.
  • A minimum of the first 7,500 words of a WIP. If you have more than 7,500 words, you can certainly send more! Please note that due to a great number of questions received re: desired words per chapter, we’ve revised our guidelines as of 2018 to reflect requested word count vs. chapter count.
  • A thorough, well-thought-out synopsis that is at least 5 pages or 1,600 words long. The synopsis is extra important with a proposal because we need to see progression of plot, character arc, storyline and, also really crucial—how it ends! See more about writing a synopsis here.
  • If you are proposing a series, a brief series outline can also be uploaded. This is not required. Series outlines usually consist of a 2-3 paragraph overview of the series arc, plus a 1-2 paragraph description of each proposed book. Please upload this as a separate document.
  • You may submit more than one project! However, please submit only one proposal per series.

 Formatting

  • Times New Roman, 12 pt, black font, double spaced.
  • Please put your manuscript title and name in the header information on each page of your proposal and synopsis.

How to submit:

  • If your book meets the guidelines above and all your material is ready and properly formatted, please use this link to submit.
  • Direct your submission to the editor who has advertised an interest in seeing manuscripts like yours! In doubt? Direct your submission to Editorial Director Angela James, Senior Editor Kerri Buckley, or Associate Editor Stephanie Doig.
  • We will consider all proposals that fulfill submission call requirements and are received by midnight EST on February 27, 2019.

For questions about this call for submissions, please email us at submissions@carinapress.com.

For more information about Carina Press, and to read our submission guidelines, please visit bit.ly/write4cp.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 16, 2019

Illustrator Saturday – Kayla Harren

I graduated from the School of Visual Arts in NYC with a BFA in Illustration. I illustrated the picture books Juma the Giraffe and Our Elephant Neighbors for Wild Nature Institute and PAMS Foundation.  Mary Had a Little Lizard, published by Sky Pony Press, was my debut picture book as an author/illustrator. My artwork has been featured in Communication Arts, 3×3 Magazine, and the Society of Illustrators Illustration Annuals.  I won the June 2017 Highlights for Children Pewter Plate Award for my illustration.

The steps of my process:

I am sharing some process images from when I was working on The Boy Who Grew a Forest: The True Story of Jadav Payeng. This double page spread of Jadav basking in the amazing forest he created needed to be lush and alive and magical.

All picture books for me start out with rough sketches. These scratchy sketches are for my eyes only and I use them to get the pacing of the story laid out.

I like to make sure the sketches I show the art director are exactly how I plan to finish them in the final art so that once they are approved, I know I won’t need to make any compositional changes after I’ve gone through the work of coloring everything.

I can usually envision how I am going to handle color and light when I am sketching, but I need to convey that to the art director. The value and light of an illustration can drastically affect the way the composition works and where the focal point is. I use gray tones in the sketches I show the art director so they can have a better idea of how the image will look and they don’t have to do a lot of guessing.

I color everything with flat colors. I keep important elements on separate layers and I usually have a separate layer for the background, mid, and foreground.

My favorite part! This is when I get to add lots of details and textures to the character’s clothing and face and to the plants.

This is the stage that really transforms the illustration. Adding shadows can direct the eye exactly where I want it to go. Shadows define shapes and add depth. When I add shadows I know I am almost there.

Highlights and warmth and little details finish off the illustration. It is ready to send to the art director!

SOME BOOK COVERS:

Interview with Kayla Harren: 

How long have you been illustrating?

I have been drawing and coloring my whole life. I started taking art seriously in college at the School of Visual Arts in NYC. After graduating in 2011, I worked on small illustration jobs until my first book was published in 2017.

What and when was the first painting or illustration that you did where someone paid you for your artwork?

I think my dad was the first person to pay me for my art. He would commission me to make portraits of his coworkers as retirement gifts. The first paid job I had from someone I wasn’t related to was illustrating short stories for the children’s book app FarFaria. That was my first experience working with an art director and going through the process of translating a manuscript into sketches, then revisions, to final artwork, all within a short deadline. It was an excellent first job to prepare me for publishing.

Have you always lived in Minnesota? Are there other children’s illustrator in your state to hang out with?

I grew up in Minnesota then went to college in New York City. After school I moved to Pennsylvania for a couple years with my husband and now I am back in Minnesota where I am surrounded by beautiful nature and wide-open spaces. Minnesota has a great kidlit community. I attend the monthly Picture Book Salon hosted by Molly Beth Griffin at the Loft Literary Center and I try to make it to as many local MN SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators) events as I can.

What made you decide to attend the School of Visual Arts in NYC get get your BFA in Illustration?

I worked as a model in New York every summer from the time I was 12. The summer before my senior year of high school I was on the subway on my way to a casting and saw an ad for SVA. I hadn’t thought of art school as an option before that point. I assumed if I wanted to study art in college I would go to a state school and major in art history. I had no idea it was actually possible to turn drawing pictures into a career. My mind was blown when I saw that ad!

Did the school help you find illustration work?

The very first job I had out of school, illustrating for the iPad app, came to me because a fellow student at SVA knew the owner of FarFaria and recommended me for the job. The school didn’t necessarily set me up with work, but the connections I made at school were invaluable in starting my career.

Do you feel art school influenced your illustrating style?

I learned the basics at school, but my art style is nothing like the work I was making while I was in school. I have grown and improved so much by studying the work of artists I love and by drawing every day. I think school was a great introduction to all types of art and from there I was able to choose my own path.

What type of illustrating were you doing before that first book?

I started out painting in acrylic and watercolor right out of school. Once I started working for the digital app with very fast deadlines, I moved to digital illustration because I needed a style that could be done quickly and be easily changed when the art director asks for revisions.

I see you are represented by Marietta Zacker at Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency. How long have you been with Marietta and how did the two of you connect?

I have been represented by Marietta Zacker at Gallt & Zacker since 2016. I submitted my portfolio and a manuscript through the agency’s online query system, and to my great surprise, she liked what I sent!

I know you wrote and illustrated Was Mary Had a Little Lizard book was that your first book?

Mary Had A Little Lizard was my first traditionally published book. The previous year I worked with Wild Nature Institute, a wildlife science research group, to create a picture book, Juma the Giraffe, as part of their education program in schools and zoos throughout Tanzania. Since then, I have illustrated two more books in their conservation education series of giraffes, elephants, and rhinos.

Was Marietta your agent at the time? If not, how did the publisher find you to illustrate the book?

I did not have an agent when I sold Mary Had A Little Lizard. To sell that book I created a sketch dummy of the entire book and colored five illustrations to show what the final artwork style would look like. I researched all the children’s publishers accepting unsolicited manuscript submissions, many of which I found in SCBWI’s “The Book” which has an updated market survey listing all the publishers in the children’s market. I followed the submission guidelines on Sky Pony’s website and I was so happy when Alison Weiss emailed me to tell me she was interested in publishing Mary.

Do you think you will write and illustrate more books?

I hope so! Writing is not my strong suit. I still need a lot of work with my storytelling skills. I keep trying to write stories, but none have taken off quite yet. I love illustrating other writer’s words, so I am very happy to keep being an illustrator while I work on my author goals in the meantime.

I noticed that Hannah’s Tall Order: An A to Z Sandwich was published by Sleeping Bear Press and your next book A Boy Like You is being published later this year. Was that a two-book deal?

It wasn’t a two book deal, they were both separate. A Boy Like You will actually be my third book with Sleeping Bear. (The Boy Who Grew a Forest is the second) Everyone at Sleeping Bear has been absolutely lovely to work with and I am so grateful they keep offering me wonderful books to illustrate!

Is The Boy Who Grew a Forest your latest book?

Yes, The Boy Who Grew a Forest written by Sophia Gholz is my latest book. It will be out March 15, 2019.

Looks like you illustrated five books published in 2018. Was that a hard task to accomplish?

It was a challenge! I am pretty organized and handle time management well, so I am proud to say I only pulled two all-nighters the whole year. I have been trained from my very first illustration job to work quickly and not fuss over things. I am getting used to saying an illustration is finished and just letting it go and moving on. I learn and grow so much through each book that by the time a new book is released to the public I feel like I am a completely different person than when I was making the book. Working on so many books has been such a great way to push myself and I can see a huge difference in what I am capable of now compared to my first job.

How many books have you illustrated?

I am just finishing up my 8th which will be out in July.

I see that you have won many awards. Can you tell us about the Highlights for Children Pewter Plate Award?

Highlights for Children chooses an “Illustrator of the Month” and awards them the Pewter Plate Award. (It really is a plate made out of pewter! I love it!) I made an illustration of a girl smelling flowers breaking through the cracks of a sidewalk for the poem “The City” for Highlights Magazine in the June 2017 issue and it won me the award. It was a dream come true to illustrate for Highlights and a very happy surprise to win the award.

Have you done any book covers?

None other than the covers of the picture books I illustrated. Hopefully in the future my answer will be yes!

Would you illustrate a book for an author who wants to self-publish?

I am only taking on books that I get through my agent or a publisher.

Have you worked with educational publishers? Which ones?

Not yet.

Have you done any illustrating for children’s magazines? Which ones?

I have worked for Highlights, Ladybug, Click, and I painted dinosaurs for several issues of Zoodinos Magazine.

Have you ever thought about illustrating a wordless picture book?

My first book that I wrote and illustrated, Mary Had a Little Lizard, is wordless. I would absolutely do it again! Some of my favorite books are wordless.

What do you think is your biggest success?

I have a hard time admitting anything I do is a success, but I think the times I feel most proud of myself are when I finish a book event. Speaking in front of people is absolutely terrifying to me, so every time I survive a read aloud and drawing demo where I didn’t embarrass myself too much, I feel like it was a great triumph!

What is your favorite medium to use?

I like working digitally. I like to be neat and organized and using a computer is perfect for that. I can create the illusion of messy texture, but there is nothing to clean up when I am done.

Has that changed over time?

Absolutely! In school I only took one computer class and only because it was required to graduate. I didn’t like using technology and I much preferred drawing with a pencil or painting with watercolor. I quickly had to teach myself how to use Photoshop when I started working under short deadlines.

Do you try to spend a specific amount of time working on your craft?

I spend as much time as it takes to get the job done. Lately I haven’t had any time to work on personal work or consciously develop a style. I get an assignment and I illustrate it the best I can and then move on to the next job. That sometimes means I’m drawing 12 hours a day. The wonderful thing about working from home is that I can be flexible with time.

Do you take pictures or research a project before you start?

I always research before I start a project. Especially when I am illustrating a landscape or lifestyle different from my own. I want to be accurate. I like to gather a bunch of research and reference when I am doing rough sketches, but I leave them behind when I go to final color so I don’t get attached or start copying the reference.

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

Definitely. So far I have never met any of my clients in person! All of my work is done though email. I have been able to work with people in Australia and Africa and England. I have made valuable connections and book deals because of social media and I have access to vast amounts of reference images and information. The internet is a crucial part of my job.

Do you use Photoshop or Painter with your illustrations?

I use Adobe Photoshop in all of my illustrations. Some of my books are a combination of pencil, colored pencil, watercolor, and digital color in Photoshop.

Do you own or have you used a Graphic Drawing Tablet when illustrating?

I used a Wacom tablet for several years, then recently I was gifted a Wacom Cintiq from my amazing family and I love it. I like drawing with a stylus directly on the screen.

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

I have so many career dreams I want to fulfill, there is so much yet to do! I saw the Society of Illustrators Original Art Show when I was still living in New York and it was such an inspiration to me. When I saw all the incredible artwork of the best children’s illustrators I knew I had to try to become an illustrator. If my artwork was accepted into the Original Art Show someday, I think I would faint.

What are you working on now?

I am finishing the illustrations for A Boy Like You written by Frank Murphy which will be published by Sleeping Bear Press in July 2019. I am also in the beginning stages of developing a nature science magazine with Wild Nature Institute called Nature’s Giants.

Do you have any material type tips you can share with us? Example: Paint or paper that you love – the best place to buy – a new product that you’ve tried – A how to tip, etc.

My favorite sketchbook is my Robert Bateman 110 lb recycled paper sketchbook and I couldn’t survive without a kneaded eraser. For digital artists, I would recommend experimenting with clipping masks. I almost always draw flat color shapes and add textures with a clipping mask.

Any words of wisdom on how to become a successful writer or illustrator?

As sensitive artists sharing our vulnerable talents, it is so important to be prepared for criticism and rejection. Learn from your rejections and grow from them, but don’t let them stop you. Rejection never stops. I still get rejected, in fact, I just opened a rejection email this morning! If you know in your heart that you must write or you must draw, then you will make it happen. Successful artists are not successful because they were never rejected, they are successful because they never stopped trying.

Thank you Kayla for sharing your talent and expertise with us. Make sure you share you future successes with us. To see more of Kayla’s work, you can visit her at: Website: http://www.kaylaharren.com/

If you have a minute, please leave a comment for Kayla. I am sure she’d love to hear from you and I enjoy reading them, too.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 15, 2019

AGENT OF THE MONTH – Dawn Frederick

Dawn Frederick, owner of Red Sofa Literary is February’s Agent of the Month.

Submission Guideline for a chance to get a first page Critiqued by Dawn is at the bottom of this post.

Red Sofa Literary

Dawn Michelle Frederick is the owner/literary agent of Red Sofa Literary, established in 2008. She brings a broad knowledge of the book business to the table, bringing multiple years of experience as a bookseller in independent, chain, and specialty stores; sales, marketing, and book development experience; previously a literary agent at Sebastian Literary Agency. She has a B.S. in Human Ecology, and a M.S. in Information Sciences. Dawn co-founded the MN Publishing Tweet Up, is the current President of the Twin Cities Advisory Council for MPR, and a teaching artist at Loft Literary. You can find her on Twitter at @redsofaliterary.

· Biography-Historical, media-related, political—ABSOLUTELY NO PERSONAL MEMOIRS
· Creative Nonfiction — It needs to be smart, with noticeable platform, and commercial. I enjoy a wide range of topics.
· History – Books that will engage the commerical reader.  ex:I listen to a LOT of MPR and NPR (all the shows, most of the podcasts)
· Humor – I love a good laugh (I represent the CHOOSE YOUR OWN MISERY series)
· Pop Culture – Especially Americana, and anything quirky
· Social Issues/Current Affairs—Women’s Studies, GLTB Studies, Social Sciences, and more.
· Sports — Less mainstream, more extreme sport, ex: Roller Derby, not so much into traditional sports
· Women’s Narratives – women’s nonfiction, diverse stories please!
· Young Adult – Fiction, Nonfiction
· Middle Grade – Fiction, Nonfiction

HERE IS WHAT DAWN IS LOOKING FOR:

A some craft books that pop culture themed – think Joss Whedon, OITNB, Boardwalk Empire.  Odd, offbeat, fun.

A CYOA (choose-your-own adventure) Graphic Novel (4 yrs in a row of asking for this)

More extreme sports YA novels for both genders.

More GLBT novels, with diversity, but also a little more light-hearted too.

More geek, all the time, for YA and MG novels and nonfiction

I generally want books that I can emotionally connect with, that go back to the teenage Dawn who was equally eclectic then, and books that have dark, contemporary themes for both fiction and nonfiction.  Nothing didactic, overly sappy, or overly boring.  No memoirs, no vampires, no mermaids, no wolves, you name it. But give me a good robot book, or gamer story and I’ll be turning the pages. And last but not least, a roller derby middle grade novel would made my derby heart really happy.

Submission Guidelines

We highly encourage everyone to send an email and/or query letter initially, before attempting to send a full book proposal or sample chapters. If there is an interest, we will directly contact the author. Once these materials are received, there is usually response time of 4-6 weeks, sometimes sooner.

If querying via email, please only put the contents of your query IN the email. We will not open attachments unless they have been requested in advance.

Dawn’s email: dawn@redsofaliterary.com

We highly encourage everyone to email a query initially, before attempting to send a full book proposal or sample chapters. If there is an interest, we will directly contact the author. Once these materials are received, there is usually response time of 2-3 months if it’s the Fall/Spring/Winter, this will depend with our individual conference schedules and commitments to our current authors.

Materials to have ready, should we request your book:
1. The full ms (should we request a partial or the full ms)
2. A full book proposal with Author Bio, Competition, Market (WHO will read the book), Promotion (HOW readers will learn about the book), Chapter Summaries (for non-fiction), and a Synopsis/Overview.
3. Sample chapters (if nonfiction)
4. Sample artwork (if a graphic novel)

HERE IS PART ONE OF MY INTERVIEW WITH DAWN:

What made you decide to open your own agency?

I was working with Laurie Harper at Sebastian Literary Agency, and she encouraged me to consider starting my own agency – as she was going to be focusing more on author consulting at some point. I had already started to establish my own niche, and it was a good time, if any to take the leap. We’ve now been open for 11 yrs J

What are your favorite genres?

I read across many categories. Generally you’ll find me reading lots of #kidlit, literary fiction, lots of nonfiction, and generally searching for books to read (for pleasure) help me remember why I became an agent. A life of reading helped me get here.

How do you handle a YA/MG author that you are interested that also writes PB books? Would you be willing to represent them or would you pass because of this? Could they have a separate agent for the other books?

As their agent, I would want to at least have a chance to see all of their #kidlit ideas.  I don’t talk about this much, but my focus in the early days of grad school was to become a professor of children’s literature. I’d hope I get first dibs on considering their ideas before they went to anyone else, as I’m looking to work any author I represent long-term.

If a manuscript has a prologue, should that be included in the sample pages?

Avoid prologues, just cut to the chase….

How important is the query letter? 

Very. I will decide if I want a book within the first few sentences. Answering queries takes time and the best ideas that come to the surface will generally have a well-written query letter. I can’t see every idea that crosses my desk, so that pitch needs to be the best it can be.

What would you like to see in the query letter? Should writers try to keep it short?

Keep those queries concise, try avoid being overly wordy. 250-300 words should more than suffice. Help me get an idea of what your book is about in 2-3 sentences, along with a bio, books of similar nature, why your book will have a readership, and a clear reason why you believe I’m specifically a good fit for your book

Should the word count for your manuscript be included in the query letter?

Yes, and it needs to meet industry standard word counts for the book you’re pitching.

Do you like comps mentioned in the query letter?

Yeppers, if you don’t have an in-depth knowledge of the category for your book, it will stand out in the query letter. When I see that an author has done this homework, the query letter is usually stronger.

You mention that you would like to receive chose your own adventure graphic novel.

I still do. I still have yet to see it.  J

Can you give us an example of a CYOA book in the market that you like?

I will of course tell you that Choose Your Own Misery is my favorite, it’s a smart series for the big kids (adults) written by Jilly Gagnon and Mike MacDonald. Three books in this series, all of them are hysterical.  A graphic novel version would be entirely different.

Do you have to be an illustrator to write a CYOA? Are they geared to middle grade readers?

CYOA generally not in the form of a graphic novel, hence why I’ve not see anything just yet.  It would be for adults (vs. kids).

Any tips on how an author can get you to ask to see more?

Write a good query, play nice in #kidlit – both in person and on social media (i.e. treat others with respect, be a person who advocates for other writers in a positive and proactive way). Write the best book you can, while also ensuring that you are actively engaging with readers across multiple platforms. I’m looking at the author, as well as how they are engaging w/ readers and fellow writers.

How far do you normally read before you reject a submission?

2-3 sentences. It takes hours to read submissions, so taking the time to write a strong query letter will go farther than rushing the process.

Any pet peeves?

Not at the moment. J

Thanks Dawn!

EVERYONE, CHECK BACK NEXT FRIDAY FOR PART TWO OF INTERVIEW WITH DAWN.

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR JANUARY 2019 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “FEBRUARY FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE”  Example: Paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it’s a picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED!Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.

Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: February 22nd.

RESULTS: March 1st.

CHECK BACK NEXT FRIDAY FOR PART ONE OF MY INTERVIEW WITH DAWN.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | February 14, 2019

Happy Valentine’s Day

Love is in the air

Cupid’s bow is drawn

Don’t move

Let his spirit wrap around your hands.

His arrow’s dipped in publishing Pixie dusk

and its aimed right at you.

SUSAN MILLER: Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 25, 2018.

BARBARA DILORENZIO: Featured on Illustrator Saturday April 14, 2012

CHANTELLE AND BURGEN THORNE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday May 27, 2017

CHERYL NOBENS: Featured on Illustrator Saturday May 12, 2018 

AMY SCHIMLER SAFFORD: Featured on Illustrator Saturday January 28, 2019.

ANNIE WILKINSON: – Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 30th 2014.

NICOLE ALLIN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday April 7, 2018. 

 

NINA MATA: Featured on Illustrator Saturday March 3, 2012.

SUSAN MILLER: Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 25, 2018.

LESLEY BREEN WITHROW: Featured on Illustrator Saturday October 21st 2017

LISA FIELDS – Featured on Illustrator Saturday September 27th 2014

AMY SCHIMLER SAFFORD: Featured on Illustrator Saturday January 28, 2019.

LESLEY BREEN WITHROW: Featured on Illustrator Saturday October 21st 2017

ANYWHERE

Love can find us
anywhere:
on a bus or bench
or chair,
in the sunlight,
starlight,
dark,
walking through
a city park,
climbing up
a snowy hill,
lonely,
fretful,
tired…
still–
like a haunting song
or poem
love will bring
each heart
back home.
 
by Eileen Spinelli

 

LESLEY BREEN WITHROW: Featured on Illustrator Saturday October 21st 2017

MARIA BOGADE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday February 9th 2013

Dolores Bartholomew – Featured on Illustrator Saturday December 4th 2010

LESLEY BREEN WITHROW: Featured on Illustrator Saturday October 21st 2017


JEANNE BALSAM: Featured on Illustrator Saturday August 28, 2010.

ENJOY YOUR DAY AND ABSORB THAT MAGICAL PUBLISHING PIXIE DUST.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

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