Susan Hughes has another new picture book LIGHTS DAY AND NIGHT: THE SCIENCE OF HOW LIGHT WORKS, illustrated by Ellen Rooney and published by Kids Can Press. Susan has agreed to share a copy with one lucky winner living in the United States or Canada.

All you have to do to get in the running is leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know other things you do to share the good news, so I can put the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter or reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. So, thanks for helping Susan and Ellen.

If you have signed up to follow my blog and it is delivered to you everyday, please let me know when you leave a comment and I will give you an extra ticket. Thanks!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

A young girl and her cat watch a firefly glow, make shadows in the sun and learn all about how light works in this accessible, kid-friendly introduction to the science of light. Where does light come from? How does it work? What is it made of? Join a young girl and her cat on a journey of scientific discovery to find the answers to these questions and more. Over the course of a summer vacation, the pair investigate the many fascinating aspects of light, including natural and artificial light; the many uses of light; how light can be absorbed, reflected and refracted; the meaning of opaque, translucent and transparent; how the eye sees light; and why some animals need less light to see than humans.

From forest fires to traffic lights, this book also provides loads of examples of sources of light. Beginning near the shore of a lake looking up at the stars on a summer night, and ending at the same shore enjoying a fireworks display, our guides offer readers an intriguing and lyrical introduction to light and all its mysteries. The second book in the delightfully informative Science of How series, award-winning author Susan Hughes’s engaging narrative gives young children an age-appropriate overview of the science of light.

Ellen Rooney’s friendly and inviting illustrations with their many shades of blue beckon readers to be a part of the characters’ fun summertime exploration. Presenting complex topics in a graphic, appealing and easy-to-digest format, this comprehensive one-of-a-kind book strongly supports the Next Generation Science Standards. The manuscript was carefully reviewed by an expert in the field. The book includes a glossary and instructions for a shadow puppet show.

BOOK JOURNEY:

It’s wonderful when the idea for one picture book story leads to another …

So, the book journey of Lights Day and Night began five years ago, back when I first came up with the concept for a manuscript featuring sounds. After I reworked and revised that manuscript, it eventually became my #stem picture book Sounds All Around: The Science of How Light Works, which was published in May, 2021 by Kids Can Press.

I loved working with Jennifer Stokes on the manuscript. She helped ensure the narrative remained strong and the concepts focussed. And the illustrator Ellen Rooney had such smart and expansive ideas for visuals to inform and entertain—and amuse—young readers.

After enjoying this process and our teamwork so much, OF COURSE I suggested writing another #stem title as a companion book to Sounds All Around! I proposed the topic of light and was delighted when Jennifer enthusiastically agreed to take a look.

I first created an outline and then, soon after, a manuscript but was able to move on quite quickly to putting together a manuscript, since I had the first book as a template.

I pored over the science curriculum standards for grades K to 3, looking for those related to light, and then worked many of them into my manuscript. This will ensure kids reading the book may have knowledge of their own that they’re learning in school about light, and, vice versa, it will support them in their learning in the classroom.

I decided to use the same basic narrative structure and framework for this text as I had in Sounds, and again aimed to create an informative text which was also gentle and lyrical in tone. I included a “words to know” section and an activity as well.

So, after my many revisions of the text, and with Ellen Rooney’s amazing roughs transformed into final vibrant coloured illustrations, the words and art became our book Lights All Around: The Science of How Light Works, which was recently published by Kids Can Press on September 7, 2021.

Oh, and good news: we were asked to come up with a series title for the books. We chose The Science of How? What do you think? Sounds enticing?

My fingers are crossed that I’m able to add more picture books to our gorgeous series!

SUSAN’S BIO:

Susan Hughes has always loved writing. When in grade five and six, she and several friends had a writing club. They met every few weeks and read aloud their poems and stories to one another. They always began by pointing out something they liked about each piece of writing; and they always learned a lot from each other’s critiques. She and another friend wrote stories and non-fiction articles and created many issues of their self-published The Horse and Bridle Club magazine. They even sold copies to friends at school and the stable where they took riding lessons!

After finishing a university degree in English at the University of Toronto, Susan was thrilled to work at a children’s publishing company where she had the opportunity to research, fact-check, write, edit, and proofread—seeing books through from the concept stage to the final in-hand product. It was thrilling! She also began to work on her own stories and submit them to editors at traditional publishing companies.

Soon after, Susan began freelancing—and she has never stopped! An editor, story coach, writer and author, Susan works with writers, both novice and experienced, providing critiques and developmental edits, and guiding them in their writing practice. She also works with educational and independent publishers to develop books for children on topics from geography and history to science and Aboriginal studies for a wide range of grade levels. She writes commissioned stories and articles for many clients.

Susan is thrilled to have more than 30 traditionally published children’s books, including picture books, chapter books, MG novels, young adult novels, both fiction and non-fiction for all ages, with publishers such as Scholastic Canada, Kids Can Press, Owl Kids Books, and Annick Press. Her books have received multiple nominations for awards, including the Forest of Reading awards, the TD Children’s Literature Awards, and the Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children’s Literature.

She has been delighted to serve as juror for many book awards and volunteer her expertise with CODE and the CNIB.

Website: www.susanhughes.ca

Twitter: @childbkauthor

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/susanhughes2518/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/susan.hughes.9465/

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ELLEN ROONEY’S BIO:

Ellen is an illustrator, designer, and artist. She’s from the state of Massachusetts, but now lives in the southern Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. Her first picture book as illustrator, Her Fearless Run, was published in April, 2019 and busy working on more!

Ellen loves graphic shapes, textured colour, printmaking, drawing outdoors, painting. Her hidden art powers are released when cutting up paper. As a designer, her superpower is x-ray vision: if she stares at dense information, she can see its lovely skeleton just waiting to be shown to the world. She  thinks this is why she really loves interpretive design (stuff like museum exhibits and nature trails). Or, she says, “Maybe I’m just a big nerd. Who can say?”

“I love what I do. I get to collaborate with nice, interesting people from all over the place to make wonderful things I couldn’t make on my own.”

Ellen was featured on Illustrator Saturday: https://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2020/06/20/illustrator-saturday-ellen-rooney/

To see more of Ellen’s work, you can visit her at:

Website: https://ellenrooneydesign.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ellenaroo/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ellenrooney/

Susan, thank you for sharing your book and journey with us. What a wonderful way to help children learn about light. I can’t wait to read it. Ellen’s illustrations are gorgeous. Good luck with the book!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 11, 2021

Illustrator Saturday – Courtney Dawson


Courtney is a freelance illustrator with a great love for drawing, reading and most kinds of ice cream. She has a background in animation and a deep love for picture books.

Courtney works both digitally and traditionally, gouache being her favorite medium. She is inspired by the world around her and all of the good in it!  Courtney loves to work on projects that are empowering, inclusive and whimsical. And she loves rainy days and painting to Sam Cooke.

Recent clients include Harper Collins, Penguin Random House, Thomas Nelson, Sleeping Bear Press and Albert Whitman.

Courtney grew up in a sunny suburb of Southern California with a love for drawing, reading and most kinds of ice cream. She moved to San Francisco after high school, where as an undergraduate she majored in Women & Gender studies and discovered her passion for creating positive texts for children that are beautiful, inclusive and empowering. Courtney also received her She specializes in color styling, prop design and children’s book illustration. She loves rainy days and painting to Sam Cooke. Courtney currently lives in Ventura with her partner and wild toddler.

HERE IS COURTNEY DISCUSSING  HER PROCESS:

I started by getting very excited for autumn to be right around the corner. Then I sketched characters. I don’t usually use references for character design.

 

Then Look at inspirations for things that felt like fall to me. For painting I usually start by blocking in colors for background and characters so I can find a cohesive color pallet that I like.

I like to experiment with different texture brushes at this stage as well.

Then I begin to refine.

I add details at the very end.

INTERVIEW WITH COURTNEY DAWSON:

 

How long have you been illustrating?

I have been drawing my whole life, but professionally about 4 years.

 

What and when was the first piece of art you created for money?

It was a piece I actually really like! It was an art test for a book I didn’t get. It ended up being one of my favorite portfolio pieces!


How did you decide to get your MFA from Academy of Art University in Visual Development after getting your BFA Women & Gender?

I have always wanted to be an artist. But at my core I am an activist. I always knew I wanted to make art that others could see themselves in. I wanted to create representation that I did not see myself in as a child. I learned about intersectionality and how it ties to race, class and gender in undergrad. I knew I wanted to make art that reflected that.

What did you do once you graduated from college?

I worked a retail job in San Francisco where I spent most of my time drawing comics behind the counter. I might have been fired from that said job…

Did you take any time off between your undergrad studies and getting your MFA?

I took a year off and applied to grad school.

Did AAUVD help you find work when you graduated?

The most helpful resource I found in art school was my teachers! Most art teachers are in your field and are so supportive and helpful to up and comers.

What type of work did you do before working as a freelance illustrator?

A month after graduating from the academy I became a first time mom!

You studied animation while getting your MFA from Academy of Art University in Visual Development. Did you do any animation work since you graduated?

I was considering taking an internship at an animation studio right before I was contacted by Nicole at Tugeau 2. I felt like a calling and I chose that route.

Was Help Wanted, Must Love Books by Janet Sumner Johnson the first book you illustrated?

Yes!

How did that opportunity come your way?

Capstone had inquired my agent Nicole about me. I read the manuscript and thought the book was so adorable. I leaped at the opportunity!

Later in 2020 you illustrated A Vote Is a Powerful Thing by Catherine Stie and published by Albert Whitman. How did you get that job?

This was another query but from Albert Whitman, Nicole and I both thought the manuscript was great and I happily took the project on.

How did you connect the Nicole at Tugeau2 and how long have you been with her?

Nicole actually found me on Instagram! I had my eye in T2 as an agency I might like to query one day. by happenstance she reached out to me.

Was Nicole responsible for getting you the job to illustrate Tani’s New Home: A Refugee Finds Hope and Kindness in America by Tanitoluwa Adewumi, Published on November 24, 2020 with Thomas Nelson?

Yes!

The Stars Beckoned: Edward White’s Amazing Walk in Space by Candy Wellins April 2021 Philomel. How long did it take you to illustrate this book?

I really took my time on that book. The stars beckoned has some of my favorite illustrations I’ve ever done in it. It took me about a year to do.

The McClure Twins: Make It Fashion by Ava McClure(Author), Alexis McClureHarperCollins June 29th 2021. How long did they give you to create the Illustrations?

This one was quick! I had about a month or two to finish all art.

How many picture books have you illustrate?

10!

I just featured ISABEL AND HER COLORES GO TO SCHOOL on Writing and Illustrating, which you illustrated for Sleeping Bear Press and published on July 15th 2021. Where you still working on The McClure Twins while illustrating this one?

I had just submitted final art for the McClure book when I started this one. Luckily I haven’t had much overlap with projects.

What do you feel helped develop your style?

Drawing a lot! Also being really nerdy about art. I definitely have picked up techniques and quirks that I have loved from classic picture book artists. I’m always giving myself space to find my own sense of who I am and I try to let my style evolve naturally

Do you have any desire to write and illustrate a picture book?

Yes! I always have so many thoughts and ideas of stories I’d love to create. I just have to hone in my writing skills.

Have you ever tried to illustrate a wordless picture book?

Not yet, but it sounds appealing

Have you illustrated anything for children’s magazines? 

Yes! I’ve worked with cricket media and highlights

Do you have studio in your house? 

Yes! We just moved to Portland. I have my own little studio now.

Do you ever exhibit your artwork?

No, but I’d like to.

Have you written or illustrated for any children’s magazines?

Illustrated yes, written no.

How long have you been work full time as an illustrator?

For about 3 years now

Is working with a self-published author to illustrate their book something you would consider?

Definitely especially if it’s a story that conveys meaning that I am passionate about


I know you will have many successes in your future, but what do you think is your biggest success so far?

Getting the opportunity to illustrate a Little Golden Book was kind of a life long dream of mine. And it was about a city I truly love. That felt really special and felt like a huge success for me.

What is your favorite medium to use?

I love gauche! I never have time to paint these days, but I’m hoping to pick up again.

Has that changed over time?

Yes, especially since right now I’m almost exclusively working digitally

What type of Graphic Drawing Tablet do you use when illustrating?

I use an iPad most of the time

Do you try to spend a specific amount of time working on your craft?

All day everyday. At least 4-5 hours everyday

Do you take pictures or research a project before you start?

Yes! I defiantly spend a lot of time mood boarding before I start to develop any kind of design.

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

Absolutely

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

Yes! I’d love to write my own book one day. I’d really like to work with kids one day as well. I’d love the chance to mentor and help other young artist get into the field.


What are you working on now?

I’m working on a really exciting book for little brown about a Dragon

Do you have any material type tips you can share with us? Example: Paint or paper that you love – the best place to buy – a new product that you’ve tried – A how to tip, etc.

Practice! And walking away when you feel stuck. Creativity is usually found for me on a long walk or brainstorming in the shower.


Any words of wisdom for new illustrators?

Keep going!

Courtney, thank you for taking the time to answer the interview questions and showing us your process. Please let me know about your future books and successes so I can share them with everyone.

You can visit Courtney using the following links:

Website: https://www.courtneyjdawson.com/

Agency: https://tugeau2.com/courtney-dawson

Behance: https://www.behance.net/gallery/67401663/Courtney-Dawson

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/courtneyjdee/?hl=en

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 10, 2021

Agent of the Month – Interveiw with Keely Boeving – Part One

Keely Boeving is an Agent with WordServe Literary. After receiving her B.A. in English from the University of Virginia, she went on to attend the Denver Publishing Institute and then began her career in New York working in the editorial department at Oxford University Press, where she acquired books for the trade history list. She moved back to Colorado in 2014 and began her own freelance editorial company before joining WordServe in 2016. She lives in Denver with her husband and their twins. You can find out more about her editorial work at www.keelyboeving.com.

She is passionate about partnering with clients to develop books that connect with readers, find success with publishers, delight our imaginations, and create real change in the world. She is drawn to books that bring new ideas and voices to the table, change our perspectives, and broaden our experiences.

In the children’s market: Keely represents select picture books, middle grade, and young adult fiction. She represents a wide range of genres and subjects and loves stories that feature characters who are quirky and complex. She is drawn to contemporary stories that take on perennial questions in a new way, excite the imagination, and allow children to see themselves in the book’s pages, perhaps for the first time.

For Non-fiction Books: Keely is looking for well-researched nonfiction books in the areas of health and wellness, business, parenting and family life, social justice, and religious studies; as well as projects from diverse and under-represented voices and is also seeking narrative nonfiction and memoir, and occasionally represents smart, well-crafted contemporary and literary fiction.

For the Christian market: She is seeking books in the areas of Christian Living, spiritual transformation, devotion and worship, and women’s topics including motherhood, relationships and marriage, work-life balance, and calling. She represents a wide range of genres and subjects, particularly in the areas of Christian living, spiritual transformation, the intersection of faith and culture, physical and mental health, embodiment, social justice, business and entrepreneurship, and motherhood, parenting, and family life. She is always seeking projects from diverse and under-represented voices.

*******

What made you get your B.A. in English from the University of Virginia?

I knew that I wanted to study English, because I’d loved books my whole life. UVA had a great program, and once I saw the campus on my first trip to Charlottesville, I was sold.

Did you know you wanted to become an agent before attending the Denver Publishing Institute?

I knew I wanted to become an editor—so after finishing the course, I moved to New York and worked as an intern for Bloomsbury and then as an editorial assistant and eventually assistant editor at Oxford University Press. The Denver Publishing Institute program introduced me to a number of wonderful editors and contacts in the publishing world, and reaffirmed my desire to go into the industry.

What made you decide to move back to Colorado after moving to NYC?

I grew up in Denver and have lots of family here. My husband was ready for a break from NYC, and we knew we wanted to be close to family when we had kids. With great weather and access to the mountains, it was a natural place to end up!

How did you get the job with WordServe Literary Agency?

After moving back to Denver, I worked as a freelance editor and copyeditor for a while. Eventually, I knew I wanted something more consistent, and I began exploring what kinds of publishing jobs existed in the Denver area. I got connected to WordServe and started essentially as the executive assistant to the president. Before too long, I was representing clients of my own.

Do you have a limit on number of clients you will represent?

I try to keep my client list to a size where I can give really close, personal attention to every project, and be available for my clients in whatever capacity they need. There isn’t a firm number; more of a feel for what my workload is over the course of each month.

Any story or themes you wish someone would submit?

I love that we’re seeing more books that reflect the diversity of our world. It’s important for kids to see themselves in the pages of the books they read, and I’m particularly interested in books with neurodiverse characters and books that explore questions of mental health in interesting and nuanced ways.

Which do you lean more towards: Literary or Commercial?

I look for that sweet spot in the middle—beautiful writing but with a hook that really grabs you.

Do you think it is okay for an author to write novels and picture books? Or do you feel it is better to focus on one age group and genre?

I think authors should start with their focus on one area, but you can certainly cross over into other genres or age groups in later books. It’s important to make your name and find your audience first, and then there can be room to grow.

What do you like to see in a submission?

I like to see a strong hook that catches my interest; information about the author (have you written before? What are the strongest points of your platform or bio? Give me a sense that you come to play.); and great sample pages.

How important is the query letter?

Extremely important. This makes or breaks whether I’m going to request more material, and I’m reading dozens each week. Your has to shine.

*******

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR SEPTEMBER 2021 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “SEPTEMBER 2021 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE” Example: Paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you put your name, the title of the piece, and genre: a picture book, chapter book, middle grade, or young adult, Non-fiction, contemporary, historical, Sci-fi, fantasy, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

PLEASE name the Word document file by putting 2021 September  – Your Name – Title of first page. Thank you.

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED! Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.

Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com. Sending it to my hotmail account will probably keep me from seeing it and including you in the running.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 20th. – noon EST

RESULTS: OCTOBER 1st.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

 

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 9, 2021

Book Giveaway: A FRIEND LIKE YOU by Frank Murphy

Frank Murphy has written a new picture book, A FRIEND LIKE YOU illustrated by Kayla Harren and published by Sleeping Bear Press  It is available in bookstores nowSBP has agreed to share a copy with one lucky winner living in the United States.

All you have to do to get in the running is leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know other things you do to share the good news, so I can put the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter or reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. So, thanks for helping Frank and Kayla.

If you have signed up to follow my blog and it is delivered to you everyday, please let me know when you leave a comment and I will give you an extra ticket. Thanks!

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

There’s nothing in the world like a wonderful friend. Friends are there to laugh with you and ready with a hug when you need one. There are forever friends and brand new friends. Friends for adventures and friends for cozy days indoors. Friends who are just like you and friends who are nothing like you at all. In this book, celebrate ALL the marvelous ways to be a friend!

BOOK JOURNEY:

Part of the story of the genesis of A Friend Like You is rooted in the two previous titles, A Boy Like You and A Girl Like You; so many folks asked me if I was considering writing a title for kids that did not have a gender attached to the title. My answer to this was always that, early on, I had been considering doing a picture book about friendship. So, with A Friend Like You I believe it’s a perfect picture book for all kids and families to choose. Although, I do believe that the messages in Girl and Boy are also universal and can reach all audiences; one thing is for sure – Kayla Harren does an incredible job ensuring that so many kids can see themselves represented in her art.

The next step was to find a friend who brought a different dimension of diversity and experience for this picture book. (It has been our goal for every new title in the “like You” series, after Boy, to have me pair with an author who brings a different perspective and expertise than my experiences and background.) I became friends with Charnaie Gordon in the spring of 2019. We connected because she was trumpeting about how much she loved A Boy Like You on her Instagram account HereWeeRead. Charnaie is a digital creator who has built a large following and created an important space helping people find diverse books and educational products. Then we met in New York City, in person, at a book convention. Instantly, our friendship ignited! I love every single thing about Charnaie – from her kindness to her grace to her humility. Plus, she is just cool – she’s genuine. Charnaie brings so much to the table, especially with picture books; she is one of the leading experts in this “kidlit” world. Our collaboration on A Friend Like You was seamless. Every aspect of tugging and pulling at each other’s ideas and writing ended up being so easy.

We both believe that A Friend Like You is meeting the world at an opportune time. So many kids (and adults) are finding some struggles with assimilating back into the “in-person” world. Being an elementary school teacher, I have witnessed and continue to see too many kids struggling with navigating their way through insecurities and apprehensions about life after this pandemic stole almost two years of “real world” living. Charnaie, the team at Sleeping Bear Press, and I hope A Friend Like You becomes a valuable resource for teachers, counselors, librarians, parents, and kids in generating conversations about friendships. If it inspires just one kid to be a better friend, to be a better listener or maybe more accepting…well, then this book would be priceless to all of us.

I do want to add that Kayla created two illustrations in this book that are my all-time favorites from any picture book. The shadows she created in the illustration of the two main characters walking their dogs are powerful. To me, they symbolize that these two characters will be friends into adulthood – lifetime friends. And the next spread of the playground – WOW! This is my favorite! The text speaks to being an ally. Kayla captured and illuminated exactly what Charnaie and I were trying to convey. Our divided world needs this message – maybe now, more than ever before. We hope the text and art on this spread sparks conversations that lead to helping families and schools heal and learn and, ultimately, grow. For me, these are the most important two pages in any picture book I’ll ever create.

FRANKS BIO:

FRANK MURPHY is a teacher who writes and a writer who teaches. He has taught a wide variety of grades at the elementary for more than 26 years. A history buff, former basketball coach & Sixers fan, and popular speaker, Frank is the author of many fun historical fiction/biography books for young readers, including several popular Step into Reading History Readers – including the Oppenheim Toy Portfolio 2006 Best Book Award Winner Ben Franklin & the Magic Squares. Most of his children’s books are about iconic people from the past like Teddy Roosevelt, George Washington, Frederick Douglass, and Clara Barton.

His newest picture book is A Boy Like You (July 2019) illustrated by Kayla Harren and published by Sleeping Bear Press. A Boy Like You is a loving tribute to boys, celebrating all the wonderful ways to be a boy and encouraging readers to be the truest version of themselves–while embracing empathy and kindness. As a teacher and father, Frank is committed to helping expand the definition of what it means to be a boy and a man, this is an important and timely message for anyone who cares about today’s male youth.

Frank was born in California, but moved to Philadelphia, PA when he was 8 years old. He’s been in the Philly area ever since. He currently teaches 6th grade.

He has written more than 18 children’s books and A Boy Like You is his favorite. He currently lives in Bucks County, PA. Visit his website at https://www.frankmurphybooks.com/.

KAYLA’S BIO:

Kayla Harren graduated from the School of Visual Arts in NYC with a BFA in Illustration. She illustrated the picture books Juma the Giraffe and Our Elephant Neighbors for Wild Nature Institute and PAMS Foundation.  Mary Had a Little Lizard, published by Sky Pony Press, was her debut picture book as an author/illustrator. Her artwork has been featured in Communication Arts, 3×3 Magazine, and the Society of Illustrators Illustration Annuals.  She won the June 2017 Highlights for Children Pewter Plate Award for her illustration.

Kayla’s books include Hannah’s Tall Order: An A to Z Sandwich and Mary Had a Little Lizard. She lives in St. Paul, Minnesota. Learn more about her at www.kaylaharren.com. Kayla was recently featured on Illustrator Saturday.

Frank, thank you for sharing your book and journey with us. I love this series of picture books. They are all so uplifting and they make great gifts. Kayla’s illustrations are wonderful and help make the books so much fun. I love every illustration, but I agree with you about the two illustrations you mentioned (the first one after the cover and the one with them walking and the shadows that is right before your bio). I think they are my favorite, too. Like the others; this book is so special. I hope you think of more things to write about, so you can keep this series going. Good luck with the book!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 8, 2021

WHY IT’S YES TO SMALL (BUT MIGHTY) INDEPENDENT PUBLISHERS

Why Small Publishers Are Sometimes Mightier Than Big Publishers by Mira Reisberg

There are so many choices when it comes to book publishing that it can make a person’s head spin. Creating a ready-to-submit manuscript is very personal and then sending it to an editor can be scary. You’ve cared for this story since its conception. To put that work into the hands of others is very difficult for some. It can be similar for artists as well. You created your portfolio, but showing that to other people? Will they see your art as special or just ordinary? It can be a lot of pressure. But the thing is, you need to see your work as something separate from yourself so that you can get the distance you need to keep on submitting until someone does get what you’re doing and wants to publish you.

The ideal is to find someone who loves your work just as much as you do. Someone who will spend the time and care for it like it was their own creation. Will the book you help create be special at a big publisher or just another book on their list? Indie Publishers have some major advantages over the bigger publishers.

The Pros

Because smaller publishers publish fewer books, their books tend to stay in print longer and generally get much more marketing attention. This is partly because of the warehouse tax, which is a separate tax for book warehousing. So if a book isn’t selling enough copies, it’s more likely to go out of print with a larger publisher who has more books warehoused. Also, because books by big-name authors and illustrators are more likely to get more attention and sales, more of the marketing budget tends to go towards those books, sometimes creating a self-fulfilling prophecy for lesser-known folks. And while there are always exceptions to this, smaller publishers tend to focus their budgets and resources on a much smaller list. Finally, your book can get lost or abandoned when an editor moves from one publishing house to another. This is often the case with bigger publishers as it’s often the only way that an editor can get a raise or move up the publishing ladder.

The Cons – Advances and Royalties

This can be both a Pro and a Con with smaller publishers. An advance is an advance payment on future royalties, which don’t kick in until after the advance is paid back. With bigger publishers, you’ll more than likely be given a much larger advance. But the Con of this is that your next book is often judged by how quickly your last book earned out its advance. So, a big advance isn’t always so fantastic. The first book that I illustrated, Uncle Nacho’s Hat, only paid a $1500 advance. But it’s still in print over 33 years later and over the years has earned over 30K and probably more. Plus I’m hoping to do a redesign, which is currently a little outdated, to hopefully bring new life to it. We did this with Baby Rattlesnake, which has been around nearly as long, and it definitely gave it a new lease on life. None of this would happen with a big publisher and both those books would probably be heartbreakingly out of print.

Another Con with Indie publishers is that sometimes they’re not as well resourced as they need to be. For this reason, it’s important to find out before you sign with them how they’re going to market your book and how reputable they are.

So as you can see, there are pros and cons to both big and smaller publishers, but because smaller publishers have MUCH lower overheads without massive NY offices, well-paid upper-level management, and much more. So for this reason, smaller publishers are often more likely to take a chance with an unknown author or illustrator.

And while many of our former students’ over 700 books have been published or contracted with big publishers, many have with smaller publishers as well, launching their careers in wonderful ways.

Each of these publishers has acquired books from our former students and several have also taken courses with us and know the quality of our student’s work. So I want to introduce you to them before inviting you to join us on September 18th & 19th in the Picture Book Palooza https://bit.ly/PBPalooza2021 and having the opportunity to submit to them PLUS FOUR other wonderful agents in an optimized way!

Joni Sussman is the Publisher at Kar-Ben Publishing, headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

With over 400 titles in print, Kar-Ben publishes 20-24 new, high-quality fiction and nonfiction Jewish-themed children’s titles each year for preschool through 6th grade. These include holiday books, life-cycle stories, Bible tales, folktales, stories about Jewish history, stories about Israel, and many other Jewish topics written by both Jewish and non-Jewish authors. Find Joni at Kar-Ben Publishing here:  ​https://www.karben.com/

 

Gnome Road is a small, family-owned independent publishing company eager to expand the careers of both developing and established creatives. Our team comes from a variety of backgrounds and has a range of experience in the children’s book publishing industry. We are also parents, business owners, and all-around daily task-masters. Together, we are joined in the common goal of bringing stories to our readers that will be treasured for a lifetime. Find Sandra here: https://www.gnomeroadpublishing.com/

Yeehoo Press is dedicated to publishing fun, enchanting, and socially responsible children’s books for audiences around the world. Yeehoo books are currently being published and sold in English and Simplified Chinese editions. Yeehoo Press has offices in Los Angeles and San Diego, California. They create and publish fun, enchanting, and socially responsible children’s books for audiences around the world, with an emphasis on quality writing and appealing illustrations. Find Helen here: https://yeehoopress.com/

With a heart filled with passion and a big dream, Callie Metler founded Clear Fork Media in 2009. In 2013, she added Clear Fork Publishing which she operates out of her corner business on the square in Stamford, Texas.

Recently, Callie expanded her growing company. She is excited to partner with Blue Whale Press, founded by Steve Kemp and Alayne Kay Christian, and Dancing Flamingo Press, a new imprint founded by Lynne Marie.

Find Callie and these imprints right here: https://www.clearforkpublishing.com/

And now for a handy dandy wee worksheet to either copy and paste or create your own. Using the short descriptions above, begin making a list of things you want to see in a publisher. The second column is going to need a bit of research as you are going to be writing down the publishers and editors who match your needs. You’ve got a good start with the people above. Tip: Websites are great, but also look at the social media of editors and publishers to learn more about them!

Hopefully, our publisher presenters will give you a good start to seeking out the right publishers for your book or illustrations. Make sure you have a good list of publishers before you start sending out your work. Check if the publisher will let you submit to them directly. If they say they don’t take unsolicited manuscripts it means you need an agent first. Don’t forget to put some research into your cover letter before you type it up! Searching examples of query letters to publishers with a web search will give you lots of examples to follow.

For more information about the wonderful world of Indie Publishing be sure to join the Picture Book Palooza! There will be 6 panels, and Meet Fabulous Indie Publishers is only one of them. With over 27 speakers, 26 prizes or giveaways, 2 parties, 6 worksheets, and EIGHT agent and editor submission opportunities, pitch and bio makeovers, Q and A, interaction, a whole year of access to the recordings and support materials after the event, and so much more all for only $99 making this the most generous conference you’ll ever attend! The Picture Book Palooza is happening soon on September 18 & 19, so register here for this 2-day interactive conference that has changed people’s lives with this link: https://bit.ly/21Palooza  ttps://bit.ly/21Palooza

Proceeds go to fund low-income and diversity+ scholarships to the Children’s Book Academy. You’ll be learning a lot so you can create the best work possible while helping other writers and illustrators create wonderful books as well! Learn more about the event and sign up here: https://www.childrensbookacademy.com/pbpalooza2021.html

And as a special bonus, I’ll be training folks in how to craft a winning pitch and bio and doing some makeovers for participants to increase their chances of publishing success.

 

Sending much love for you and your creations,

Mira & the CBA gang xoxox

Dr. Mira Reisberg is the Director of the Children’s Book Academy and an acquiring editor and art director at Clear Fork Publishing’s kidlit imprint Spork. She loves helping children’s book creatives make magical, meaningful, or just plain fun marketable kid’s books. She has worn just about every hat in the industry, except as a publisher, and looks forward to helping more creatives make and publish wonderful books before hopefully retiring or semi-retiring next year.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Nancy Churnin’s picture book CHARLIE TAKES HIS SHOT, HOW CHARLIE SIFFORD BROKE THE COLOR BARRIER IN GOLF, illustrated by John Joven and published by Albert Whitman in 2018, is coming out on September 15th in paperback. 

 Nancy has agreed to share a book with one lucky winner in the U.S. mailing territory. All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you do to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter, reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book. Thanks for helping Nancy and John.

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Charlie Sifford loved golf, but in the 1930’s only white people were allowed to play in the Professional Golf Association. Sifford had won plenty of Black tournaments, but he was determined to break the color barrier in the PGA. In 1960 he did, only to face discrimination from hotels that wouldn’t rent him rooms and clubs that wouldn’t let him use the same locker as the white players. But Sifford kept playing, becoming the first Black golfer to win a PGA tournament and eventually ranking among the greats in golf.

BOOK JOURNEY:

Charlie Takes His Shot, like so many of my stories, began with a question.

There are many picture books about the same people who broke down barriers. I’ve long admired Jackie Robinson, who broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball, but I didn’t feel I needed to add to the many books about him.

So I wondered: who broke color barriers in other sports? Since my brother Marc Churnin loves golf, I wanted to know who broke the color barrier in his favorite game.

That’s how I found Charlie Sifford. Who? How was it that I never heard of the man who broke the color barrier in golf?

I looked up everything I could find about Charlie Sifford. There wasn’t much. Yes, he was in newspaper articles and had written a 1992 autobiography called Just Let Me Play that was, at that time, out of print. But there was no picture book for kids. Why?

The more I found out, the more perplexed I became. Charlie Sifford is among the most admirable, courageous heroes I have ever researched. He was so deserving of a picture book biography. I turned to a World Golf Hall of Fame golf writer I admired – Dan Jenkins – and shared what I’d learned about Charlie Sifford. Dan corroborated what a great man he was and even ended up writing the blurb for the back of the book.

Dan Jenkins passed away in 2019 at age 90, but I will always treasure the words he wrote to me, words that live on as a blurb on the back of the hardcover book: “I knew Charlie Sifford. I was covering the tournament when Charlie won his biggest title, the 1969 Los Angeles Open…He would experience just as great a thrill to see this lovely tribute of a book that Nancy Churnin has written and know that it might help another hard-working kid fight to achieve a dream.”

I reached out to Dr. Tony Parker, historian at the World Golf Hall of Fame; Laury Livsey, senior director at the PGA Tour History and Bob Denney, PGA of America historian for information. They were all great help. I watched videos of Charlie Sifford receiving the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in the White House in 2014 and talking about how much that meant to him. I studied his obituaries and was particularly fascinated by the large role Charlie Sifford played for Tiger Woods, one of the greatest golfers of all time, who referred to Charlie as his unofficial grandfather because without Charlie, Tiger said, Tiger’s dad wouldn’t have picked up the game of golf and taught it to his son. I learned that Tiger Woods named his own son Charlie in honor of Charlie Sifford.

That’s why you can see Charlie Sifford’s photo in the Tiger Woods exhibit at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C.

Through my research, I was able to provide illustrator John Joven with many photographs. John took those photos and found the feelings that touch the hearts of kids who read the book – from the fear of young Charlie as he sneaks at night onto the golf course where he was forbidden, because of the color of his skin to play, to the older Charlie, whose swing radiates with courage and joy.

It has been my privilege to reach out to and get to know Charlie Sifford’s family, particularly his son Charles Sifford Jr. and daughter-in-law Annie Sifford and their daughter Julia Sifford-Poindexter. It was very important to me that the family felt I got the story right and did honor to the man who should be revered for the way he used his skill with golf to fight for civil rights.

The final irony of my journey is that even though I set out to write about a lesser known but deserving hero – someone who had been left out of the national conversation – my research spun me back around to a very familiar worthy person – Jackie Robinson.

That’s right. I discovered that Jackie Robinson was a friend of Charlie Sifford’s. Even better, their friendship revealed a side of Jackie Robinson I hadn’t been aware of – Jackie’s dedication to helping others achieve their rights. Jackie, who spoke up for Charlie’s right to play, ended up playing a key role in the book. Just when Charlie may have been getting discouraged by the Caucasian clause that didn’t allow any person of color to play on the PGA Tour, Jackie wrote an article in the New York Post making a powerful case for Charlie’s right to play.

Among the most treasured parts of my book journeys are the friends I meet along the way. I’m so happy that Charlie Takes His Shot has led to a friendship with the Sifford family. I am so honored that Charlie’s great-grandson, Gregory Poindexter, loves to share this story.

Charlie Sifford died in 2015 at age 92. Next year, 2022, marks what would have been Charlie’s centennial year. Many events are being planned by his family and by WME Legends, a management company focused on estate and brand management for late entertainment artists, to honor him. I hope that Charlie Sifford’s 100th year brings him the recognition he has long deserved. I hope that the low-priced paperback edition of the book that my publisher, Albert Whitman & Company, is launching Sept. 15, will help make the book more accessible to kids everywhere.

I’m thrilled to that there will be a blurb from Charles Sifford Jr. on the back of the new paperback edition.

I had no idea how rich and rewarding the journey that started with a question would be. I hope my experience inspires others to ask questions and to follow where they lead. Questions may lead to books, to friendships and to happiness in the hearts of children. If you’re lucky, as I was, they may lead to all three.

NANCY’S BIO:

Nancy is an author of ten\ books. She is a native New Yorker and a graduate of Harvard University, with a master’s from Columbia University. She loves hanging out with friends and fellow children’s book authors as a member of the Ink Think Tank, the Nonfiction Ninjas on Nonfiction-Ninjas.com, the Nonfiction Chicks organizing the annual nffest.com and the Book Meshuggenahs, organizing annual Chai-ku and Be a Shamash contests.

Nancy is proud to be a Writing Barn instructor, a member of the Texas Library Association, 12X12 and Rate Your Story, and the PALS coordinator for the North Texas chapter of SCBWI. She enjoys virtual and in person Author Visits. Book her through Authors and More, or on her Contact Page.

She is represented by Karen Grencik at Red Fox Literary

Nancy Churnin is the author of THE WILLIAM HOY STORY, HOW A DEAF BASEBALL PLAYER CHANGED THE GAME (Albert Whitman), on the 2016 New York Public Library Best Books for Kids and Bank Street College Best Children’s Books list, the 2017 Texas Library Association’s 2X2 and Topaz lists, 2017-2018 Kennebec Valley Book Award Books, the 2018 Illinois School Library Media Association’s Monarch Award Master List, Connecticut’s 2018 Charter Oak Children’s Book Awards list, the 2018-2019 Louisiana Young Readers’ Choice awards and the 2017-2018 Armadillo Readers’ Choice Awards list.

MANJHI MOVES A MOUNTAIN, on the 2021 Sakura Medal shortlist, 2020 Greenwich Reads Together Elementary School Selection, winner of the 2019 Anne Izard Storytellers’ Choice Award and 2018 South Asia Book Award, a 2018 Children and Teen’s Choice Book Awards finalist, a 2017 Junior Library Guild selection, a Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People 2018, a Silver Eureka Award-winner, a Little Free Libraries/Children’s Book Council Pick for the Action Book Club and Ezra Jack Keats Award finalist and on the Wisconsin School Library Association’s Picture This list.

CHARLIE TAKES HIS SHOT: HOW CHARLIE SIFFORD BROKE THE COLOR BARRIER IN GOLF is a Silver Eureka Award-winner, on the Wisconsin School Library Association’s Picture This list and a Ruby Bridges Reading Festival selection at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, featured at International Literacy Association’s Children Literacy Day in Austin.

IRVING BERLIN, THE IMMIGRANT BOY WHO MADE AMERICA SING is a 2019 Sydney Taylor Book Award Notable Book and 2019 Social Studies Notable Trade Book for Children. It was featured in the 2018 GREAT BOOKS FOR KIDS by Elizabeth Bird and the Evanston Public Library, in the 31 DAYS, 31 LISTS: 2018 UNIQUE BIOGRAPHIES by Elizabeth Bird and School Library Journal, in the 31 DAYS, 31 LISTS: 2018 NONFICTION PICTURE BOOKS by Elizabeth Bird and School Library Journal; THE BEST JEWISH CHILDREN’S BOOKS OF 2018 by Marjorie Ingall and Tablet Magazine; the 7 BEST JEWISH BOOKS FOR KIDS by The Children’s Book Review and RONNIE’S AWESOME LIST OF BOOKS that teach about social justice and activism.

THE QUEEN AND THE FIRST CHRISTMAS TREE was picked for A MIGHTY GIRL’s 2018 list.

MARTIN & ANNE, THE KINDRED SPIRITS OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND ANNE FRANK, a 2020 Books for a Global Society Notable from the International Literacy Association; on the 2020 New York City Department of Education Civics for All list; a 2020 Wisconsin State Reading Association Picture This! pick; a 2020 Wassmuth Center for Human Rights pick; selected for the 2020 Social Justice and Children’s Literature list of The Pirate Tree, a collective of children’s and young adult writers interested in children’s literature and social justice issues; presented at the NYC School Librarians annual conference in NYC and the Museum of Tolerance in LA; on the 2020 PJ Library’s Jewish Books to Read in Honor of MLK Jr. Day; a 2019 March Book Buzz pick for the eMissourian, Children’s Book Council’s Hot Off the Press list and Ruby Bridges Reading Festival selection; 2019 featured book at Tulisoma South Dallas Book Fair at African American Museum in Fair Park, Dallas; a 2019 pick for the Brave Bookshelf, a list of books that build moral courage in children, by ParentMap; a Civil Rights and Race reading list selection by the Jewish Book Council.

BEAUTIFUL SHADES OF BROWN, THE ART OF LAURA WHEELER WARING, released Feb. 4, 2020, a Silver Eureka honoree from The California Reading Association, A Mighty Girl pick on the Mighty Girl 2020 Summer Reading List, a Civic Nebraska selection.

On April 1, 2020: FOR SPACIOUS SKIES, KATHERINE LEE BATES AND THE INSPIRATION FOR ‘AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL’ A Mighty Girl pick on the Mighty Girl 2020 Summer Reading List.

In Fall 2021: A QUEEN TO THE RESCUE, THE STORY OF HENRIETTA SZOLD, illustrated by Yevgenia Nayberg, published by Creston Books/Lerner Books

In Fall 2021: DEAR MR DICKENS, illustrated by Bethany Stancliffe, published by Albert Whitman

She lives in North Texas with her husband, a dog named Dog and two cantankerous cats.

JOHN JOVEN’S BIO:

John grew up in Bogotá, Colombia and studied graphic design at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. He still lives there with his wife Ana and 2 children, Avril and Ian. He is fortunate enough to work in his home studio, where he is able to share his passion of drawing and painting with his children while working on projects. He started drawing at an early age and when he was six year old, his parents enrolled him in his first painting, sculpture, and character design class. He remembers his first attempt at illustration drawing Transformers and “Condorito” (a comic character based on anthropomorphic condor from a Chilean cartoonist). He was hooked. John continued to study art with plastic artists. When not illustrating, he enjoys spending quality time with his children, playing soccer with his friends, watching movies and traveling. He has recently visited Argentina, Cuba, and Peru.

Below are some of the titles he recently illustrated, Glasses: Eureka! The Biography of an Idea by Lori Haskins Houran (Kane Press), A Little Bit of Dinosaur by Elleen Hutcheson & Darcy Pattison (Mims House), The Benchwarmers by Raymond Bean, An Aesop’s Fable series (Usborne Publishing), Christmas Activity Book by Karl Jones (Penguin Workshop), Hillel Takes a Bath by Vicki L. Weber (Behrman House), Preschool, Here I Come! by David J Steinberg (Grosset & Dunlap), El patito feo (Planeta), The Magic of Sharing by Ruben Lora and Ksenia Startseva-Lora (Ruben Lora Echavarria), How the Crab Got His Claws and Just So Stories for Little Children by Rosie Dickins (Usborne Publishing Ltd), Digging for Dinosaurs by Jaye Garnett (Cottage Door Press), Charlie Takes His Shot by Nancy Churnin (Albert Whitman & Company), Bulldozer Dreams by Sharon Chriscoe (Running Press), How the Leopard Got His Spots and How the Camel got his Hump (Usborne), How The Whale Got His Throat by Anna Milbourne by Anna Milbourne (Usborne), The Elves and the Shoemaker (Usborne), and many more.

Website: https://www.nancychurnin.com/

Charlie Takes His Shot: https://www.nancychurnin.com/charlie-makes-his-shot

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NancyChurninBooks

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nancy.churnin/

On Twitter: https://twitter.com/nchurnin

On Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nchurnin/

Nancy, thank you for sharing your book and journey with us. It was fun to learn about Charlie and how he broke through the color barrier in golf. And it help understand the past and see how far we have come. Charlie provides a good role-model for all of us. John’s illustrations are rich and wonderful. He was a good choice to bring your book alive. Good luck with the book!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

W & I Full Manuscript Virtual Writers Retreat Nov. 13th – 14th open!

Novel Writers: One hour full manuscript novel critique up to 72,000 words – Plus, one 25 page – 30 minute critique with a second agent, and a first page session, plus optional critique group

For PB Writers &/or Illustrators: Four picture book one hour critique not over 25 pages total – Plus, one 30 minute picture book critique with a second agent – Also, an optional hour group critique session to discuss your manuscript with the other writers in your assigned group.

Spots are limited. Please email: Kathy.temean (at) hotmail.com Put 2021 Fall Virtual Writer’s Retreat in Subject Box. Please include a little blurb about your manuscript – what you write and what you plan to submit – I will reply. NOTE: Everyone receives two agent critiques: A full manuscript critique and a 25 page critique, plus a group first page session with two agents, plus optional writer group.

Cost: $780

Option to work in a critique group prior to submitting manuscripts. Each writer gets 1hour to discuss their manuscript with group.(must read other writer’s manuscripts)

Click for more details and list of agents.

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HAPPY LABOR DAY

FORGET THE LAUNDRY.

Louise-Marie Fitzpatrick was featured on Illustrator Saturday

FORGET CLEANING

GLENN ZIMMER: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

FORGET MOWING

JOE CEPEDA: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

FORGET TILLING THE LAND.

GRETA SONGE: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

TODAY IS THE DAY TO ENJOY THE FRUITS OF YOUR LABOR

Labor Day in the United States is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country.

SUSAN MILLER: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

Labor Day became an official federal holiday in 1894.

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 TODAY IS LABOR DAY – TIME TO DO FUN THINGS

Here are some ideas:

Grab your bike and pedal.

ROMINA GALOTTA: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

Play some music and dance.

SIMONA CECCARELLI: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

FIND A SPOT TO TAKE A NAP. 

FRANCISCO FONSECA: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

HAVE A PICNIC

LUCY SEMPLE: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

cookout

HAVE A COOKOUT

JEFF EBBELER: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY 

sunflowers

STOP BY A FARMER’S MARKET

SUSAN SWAN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

fishing

GO FISHING

JAMES LORNAN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

DON’T NEED A BOAT. JUST FISH FROM THE SHORE.

KIRBI FAGAN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

 

lynnoe-bfloat_parade_lynnorbontigaocropped

ENJOY THE BEACH

LYNNOR BONTIGAO: www.lynnorbontigao.com

EXPLORE THE DUNES

MATT SHU: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

collecting seashells

COLLECT SOME SHELLS

SUSAN SWAN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

sailing

FLOAT DOWN A LAZY RIVER

RAFAEL LOPEZ: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY 

GO SAILING

SIMONA CECCARELLI: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

Izzy+meets+a+turtle+ frog final

CHECK OUT THE WILDLIFE

CATHY GENDRON: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

922896_530114813713409_741109538_n

VISIT YOUR FAVORITE WATERING HOLE

CRAIG ORBECK: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

BLOW SOME BUBBLES.

KAYLA HARREN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

PUT THE TOP DOWN AND GO FOR A DRIVE.

David Salzay was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

GET ANOTHER DAY AT THE BEACH.

Andy Leimontas featured on Illustrator Saturday.

RIDE A ROLLER COASTER OR FERRIS WHEEL

ROGER ROTH: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

RIDE A SKI LIFT BEFORE THE SNOW

GILBERT FORD: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

Let someone serenade you as you mosey down a river.

Kim Gatto was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

RELAX AND HAVE A DRINK.

Kelsey Garrity-Riley was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

WATCH BIRDS BUILDS BUILD A NEST.

Gile Laroche was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

CLIMB A HILL AND FLY A KITE.

Louise-Marie Fitzpatrick was featured on Illustrator Saturday

NO HILL? FLY YOUR KITE IN YOUR BACKYARD!

Mike Ciccotello was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

WALK THOUGH A FIELD OF FLOWERS.

KIRBI FAGAN: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

SWIM WITH THE FISHES.

COLLEEN KOSINSKI: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

GO FOR A HIKE AND BIRD WATCH, BUT WATCH YOUR BACK.

COLLEEN KOSINSKI: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

GO SHOPPING.

Xindi Yan was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

ENJOY ALL THE STORES.

BOB MCMAHON: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

HOW ABOUT A TEA PARTY?

RUTH SANDERSON: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

SPREAD OUT ON THE GRASS.

Louise-Marie Fitzpatrick was featured on Illustrator Saturday

CHASE FROGS

Laura Bifano from In The Red Canoe.

TAKE ONE LAST DUNE BUGGY RIDE?

Teresa Wiles was featured on Illustrator Saturday

HOT AIR BALOON RIDE ANYONE?

Pat Archilles was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

YOU MAY SEE SOME BIRDS ON YOUR RIDE

SAM KALDA: FEATURED ON ILLUTRATOR SATURDAY

START YOUR DAY WITH ICE CREAM

SHAMAR KNIGHT-JUSTICE: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY

TOP OFF YOUR DAY WITH SOME MORE ICE CREAM.

Rashin Kheiriyeh was featured on Illustrator Saturday.

ENJOY YOUR DAY WHATEVER YOU DO!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 5, 2021

Book Giveaway: The EXTRAODINARY PAUSE by Sara Sadik

Sara Sadik has written a picture book, The EXTRAODINARY PAUSE, illustrated by Karine Jaber published by Eifrig Books. Sara has agreed to share a copy with one lucky winner living in the United States.

All you have to do to get in the running is leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know other things you do to share the good news, so I can put the right amount of tickets in my basket for you.

Sharing on Facebook, Twitter or reblogging really helps spread the word for a new book, so thank you for helping Sara Karine.

If you have signed up to follow my blog and it is delivered to you everyday, please let me know when you leave a comment and I will give you an extra ticket. Thanks!

BOOK DESCCRIPTION:

The Extraordinary Pause is a keepsake testament of the pandemic of 2020-2021, a tribute to the simple and remarkable efforts people made in the face of the unexpected and unknown, and a tool to discuss how it is affecting kids as they start heading back to school. This book is a wonderful tool for reflecting on the physical, mental, and emotional impact of this extraordinary event. The text is complimented with thoughtful and poignant illustrations with a minimal color palette and plenty to explore for the young audiences, as well as a few talking points to help kids reflect and remember this experience.

This book will have a place in a child’s permanent collection of childhood favorites. It will be a place to return to as we reflect with our kids on the challenging period we experienced during the extraordinary pause and help us all to grapple with the social, physical, and mental parts of the journey.

If you purchase an ebook you can receive a coupon code for a discount on shipping for a hardcover copy by going to Eifrig Publishing.

BOOK JOURNEY:

I know everyone says this, but it’s true – writing a book is like having a baby – so emotionally draining and probably the most rewarding thing you will ever do.  In the end, it often comes down to those final edits and last trimester where I mean, wow you just want that baby to be born and the book to be out.

Let’s rewind for a sec because this book was really nothing that we forced. It really wasn’t a ‘planned pregnancy’ but more like wow, these two bottles of wine (okay 3) are so good and opps here’s your third little baby. At least that’s how it was in my family.

So, the idea for the book kind of just came to us because our reality was this never-ending pause on life, which was the original title of the book.  We were under harsh lock down restrictions with curfews and tantrums (both from me and my children – mostly me!) and homeschooling so the idea just fell into my lap.  I’m a bit believer in capturing the essence of what I am experiencing in my life. Whether that considered to be autobiographical or me simply trying to take a snapshot of a series of moments (typically challenging ones) and writing about it.

I began getting together a working draft together that I liked and could then explore the imagery with Karine.  It didn’t take long for us to realize that Covid had impacted everyone. It didn’t matter where you were living or what color your skin was or how your eyes looked, what mattered was we all were forced to experience this “extraordinary pause” to some degree or another.

I was thrown into a similar situation with my first book, Finding the Magic in Mommyhood.  Adriana, my first baby, was born breech and so diagnosed with hip dysplasia. She had to be in a brace for almost 8 months and could only be out of it one hour a day – typically to shower.  Countless scraps of paper and notebooks were scribbled on during those 8 months capturing what I was thinking and feeling through it all. Writing has always been therapeutic for me where I have the tendency to get my thoughts out on paper and so experiencing the lockdown “giving birth” to The Extraordinary Pause was no exception.  The commonality between the two books and the third book I am working on (title yet to be disclosed…shhh!) is highlighting that we are more similar than different not only in our biological elements but in our seemingly unique experiences that have more in common than not.

We knew that we wanted to publish it Internationally and not self-publish it or print it locally, so we began googling lists. We needed a publishing house that would see the potential vastness in our story without requiring an agent. I knew that this was a time sensitive story – or so I thought – little did I know that we would still be wearing masks and living through a pandemic 2 years later. UGH.

Eifrig Publishing was on a list of publishing houses who don’t require you to go through an agent first which was exactly what I wanted to do. Typically publishing houses want you to have an agent that you’ve signed with. It was refreshing to be able to deal directly with a potentially publishing house and they were wonderful in supporting us but also giving us advice to change what needed to be changed to make the story that much stronger. This is so hard particularly with a children’s book because the word count is so smallbut they managed to a) convince us to “Kill our darlings” as Anne Lamott would say and b) hold our hand in producing a story they felt had the potential to succeed and one we still loved.

We worked on it for a while tweaking and cutting and honestly reading it to the harshest critics of all – our kids. We have five between the two of us so getting their take on the story and illustrations was invaluable They wouldn’t hesitate to tell us if a line was “weird and confusing” or if they though that a specific illustration didn’t fit with the line I had written. They were relentless and we have them to thank for our concise but beautifully put together final version.

The illustrations are a huge part of the book. The talented illustrator, Karine and I have worked together on a few other projects, so she understands my need to take control and I understand her need to push back and tell me when something isn’t working. She is the perfect springboard to bounce ideas off and simply takes the concept I am trying to depict through my words and gives it a vibrant heartbeat on the page.

Our mission was, and still is to take an all-encompassing concept like the pandemic and beautifully simplify it as if told from a child’s point of view. This book is a keepsake to remember this time, reflect on it and most importantly bridge the gap between our differences as we have all been touched in one way or another by this “big mean bully”.

SARA’S BIO:

Sara Sadik, a Palestinian/Lebanese energetic mom of 3 puzzle pieces who delivers her distinct brand of warm candid humor with an extra dose of sass in a traditional Arabic coffee cup.

A Post-It/highlighter/notebook aficionado who/that tries to always tell it/call it like it is. Her secret sauce is that she believes in finding humor in any situation and she’s on a mission to make you see the lighter side breathe, and know you’re not alone in this unpredictable odyssey through mommyhood.

Married to America-born Syrian Omar, whose investment career finances her Starbucks 1/2 shot soy cappuccinos, together they’re thirtysomethings who used to skydive and go on safaris for kicks, but now enjoy looking for stuffed bunnies and superman band-aids.

With a Palestinian dad and a Lebanese mom, she’s lived on three continents, in five countries, and muses on how moms-to-be and moms-in-action think, feel, question, and seek magic in their lives—regardless of location: from Delaware to Dubai, where she has lived for the past seven years. She reads to her kids on most nights (usually I Love You Stinky Face by Lisa Mccourt) but never skips a morning dance off (usually Shakira or Mumford and Sons).

A big believer in pinkie promises, peanut better and no surprise – magic, Sara will have coffee with anyone for the chance to vent about mother-in-laws and share in a good ol’ fashioned sobfest. A kid at heart she knows every single word to every single Disney song (a task she accomplished before having kids) and loves the idea of free samples.

She has been previously worked for/employed by The Daily Star newspaper, the U.N. and The Prime Minister’s Office in Dubai until they realized that her creativity and dance moves were unproductive. Or so she tells herself.

KARINE’S BIO:

Karine Jaber is a French Lebanese Graphic Designer and Illustrator who has made Dubai her home for the past 15 years. She spent the last 7 years as a freelancer which made her highly skilled in managing and coordinating graphic design projects from concept through completion.

When she is not partnering with some cool brands to create loud and quirky graphics, she is illustrating her life out on Instagram under the name of “This Little Individual” or being part of exhibitions around town. Her style of drawing is fresh, fun and a bit childish but it is ultimately relatable and guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

Thank you Sara for sharing your book and journey with us. This is a a wonderful tool for children and adult to help reflect on the physical, mental, and emotional impact of this extraordinary event. I pray the world never has to deal with something like this again, because it really has changed out world. Your book looks so hopeful and probably will be used going forward to look back and help teach children what happened. Karine did a great job with the illustrations to help you tell your story. Good luck with the book!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 4, 2021

illustrator Saturday – Shamar Knight-Justice

Shamar is an illustrator based in Atlanta, Georgia. He grew up with a crayon in his hand and a love for patterns. He currently serves as the principal of an elementary school in Southwest Atlanta, where his scholars’ stories and personalities inspire him to create illustrations that honor their identities. When not drawing, Shamar loves to spend time hoarding collage materials, going on long walks with his family, and devouring the nearest pancake.

Shamar Knight-Justice currently serves as the School Principal at Ethos Classical. Shamar graduated from North Carolina A&T in 2010 with a degree in Business Marketing. After graduation, he became a member of Teach For America in Charlotte, North Carolina where he taught secondary English for four years, before then moving to Washington, D.C. and teaching elementary scholars for two years. Shamar previously served as the Board Chair for The Collective Atlanta, which is Teach For America’s alumni of color association, and helps create events and opportunities that strengthen the rapport between current corps members and alum of color. Shamar has also worked for Teach For America at two different training institutes for first year teachers, serving as an instructional coach for two years, and a summer school principal for three years. He served as an Assistant Principal for five years before becoming a School Principal. He is also a member of the Atlanta cohort of Profound Gentlemen, which seeks to develop and retain male educators of color. In his spare time, Shamar enjoys scribbling book ideas in his notebook, and window-shopping with his wife at J. Crew.

SHAMAR DISCUSSING HIS ILLUSTRATING PROCESS:

I typically start with an idea that I want to execute and then go on a search for reference materials. For this piece, I was drawn to the idea of a girl flying a plane, and then I came across Bessie Coleman, who was the first Black woman to get her pilot’s license.

Next, I sketch out the scene primarily focusing on the character. I like to use one of the Dry Ink brushes in Procreate because it has a sketchy texture which helps me stay loose, and keeps me from overthinking. I like my sketches to be messy.

After I do the sketch of the character, I start to think about the background. I knew I wanted this one to be a night scene with clouds so I determined the colors of the sky and the moon/stars. I like to color using a Chalk-textured brush, and use a combination of water color brushes for the sky.

Next, I lay on the flat colors for the character, and see what goes well with the background. Before then adding more texture and shading.

Then, I take time to add texture and details to the piece, and play around with the coloring and lighting.

Finally, I do some additional highlights, and then slowly step away from it so that I don’t have the urge to change anything else.

SHAMAR KNIGHT-JUSTICE

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Northern Virginia, specifically Leesburg and Ashburn which are suburbs of the Washington, D.C. Metro Area.

 

It is obvious that your students have inspired your illustrations, but do you think your art has inspired your students to become future artists?

I do! But even more so, I hope they realize that they’re already artists. At my school, Ethos Classical, we truly value scholars’ creativity and imagination, and as adults it’s our job to provide them with the opportunities to practice those gifts, and sometimes it means we need to step to the side and allow them to think and explore. I hope my art helps scholars realize that becoming an author or illustrator is less abstract than it feels most times, and is as concrete as the teacher standing in front of them each day.

What were your goals when you went for a BS degree in Marketing from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University?

My goal was to run my own business. I didn’t know what that business would be, but I knew I wanted to know how to run whatever it was. My dad has been an entrepreneur his entire life, and I was and still am inspired by his daily hustle to provide for our family. I wanted to become an expert in the grind.

How did you go from marketing to education?

During my time at A&T, I spent time volunteering with The Boys and Girls Club of America located in Greensboro. Sometimes I would visit my mentee at his elementary school, and spend time with his class, and I realized I felt a ton of joy being in that space. Before my senior year, I applied to join Teach For America, and was accepted into the 2010 Charlotte corps.

Did you minor in education at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University?

No.

I know nothing about these Teach For America. In New Jersey you need a degree in education and a higher one to be a principal. There are a few special programs where someone who doesn’t have an educational degree can earn it by working in a school while attending classes. Is that similar to what you did? Whatever you did you look like you it was the right thing helping so many children.

Yes, that’s exactly what Teach For America is. You get a teacher certification, and work towards a Master’s degree during the two-year commitment.  I initially thought I’d only stay in education for two years, and then go to law school. I ended up falling in love with teaching and now this is my 12th year in education.

Have you taken any illustrating classes?

Not in any traditional setting. Currently, I take advantage of any online platforms I see that have lessons. I’ve watched hours and hours of videos on Skill Share and 21 Draw over the last few years, and have participated in a ton of virtual conferences and workshops. I complete those projects to practice and explore techniques.

How long have you been illustrating?

I’ve been drawing my entire life, but got serious with it in 2019. My wife purchased me an iPad for Christmas, and I’ve spent hours on it every morning, every day since then.

What was the first thing you did where someone paid you for your artwork?

When I first started drawing on my iPad and posting work online, people would reach out for commissions. My first commissioned piece was a picture of a friend’s niece next to the first letter of her name.

Do you exhibit your illustrations?

Not consistently. Before the pandemic started, at my school we used to do exhibits of scholar artwork where families would be invited in, and listen to their scholar present their work. I had the honor of presenting at one of the exhibits, and I felt tremendous gratitude to be around such artistic young scholars.

Did you add Justice to your last name, since that word seems to go with your goals for children?

Nope, been my name since birth. I love it though. I was the first Knight-Justice ever, now it’s me, my wife, Nicole, and our son, Caiden.

New Born Caiden

Caiden at 3 months

Was the picture book, Ari J.’s Kinky, Curly Crown by Ain Heath Drew that was published by Orange Hat came out in February your first illustrated book?

Yes, it was! I learned a lot about myself and the publishing journey through that experience. I’m truly grateful for Ain and the team at Orange Hat. Ari J. was a character I loved bringing to life on the page.

How did that contract come your way?

Ain and I used to work with each other at a previous school. Once I started posting illustrations on Instagram, she reached out and asked if I would want to come on as the illustrator for a book she had signed on to do with Orange Hat.

How did you meet Christy Tugeau Ewers and get representation with The Cat Agency?

On Instagram I started following a lot of artists that posted beautiful and powerful children’s book work, and realized a pattern of a few of them being represented by The Cat Agency. When looking at the artists Christy represented, and the values of her agency, I knew that she was who I wanted to represent me. But I was terrified! So I kept drawing every day I didn’t reach out to her until months later, after she followed me on Instagram. That gave me the confidence to officially reach out, and amazingly she responded to me the next day. We had a few more conversations and then I signed on officially in February.

Has all those children around you everyday inspired any desire to write and illustrate a book?

Certainly. Every single day I am inspired by our scholars’ humor, youthfulness, tenacity, and spirit. I want to be able to tell them stories AND tell their stories. Something that brings me immense joy is seeing beautiful books in children’s hands.

Do you always use collage to create your illustrations?

Not in all of them, but most recently a lot of my work has included collage. I’m in love with cool patterns and unique textures, so I’m always looking for a medium that is able to generate that aesthetic. Collaging also allows me to include papers/typography/images that are relevant to the topic, which I feel add something special to the vibe of the piece.

Have you done any art for greeting card companies?

No, I have not.

What about educational publishers? Have you done any work for them?

No, I have not.

Would you like to write and illustrate a picture book?

I would love to! I’ve written for as long as I could draw, and can definitely envision a book that I’ve both written and illustrated.

Would you be open to illustrating a book for an author who wants to self-publish?

At the moment, only if it’s Ain Heath Drew.

Have you ever tried to illustrate a wordless picture book?

I haven’t, but it seems like a fun and painful challenge. I love words even more than I love pictures, so I would be hesitant to do it.

Have you illustrated anything for children’s magazines?

I have not.

Do you have studio in your house?

I do! Once my wife saw that I was drawing consistently, she was onboard for us to convert one of our guest bedrooms into a creative space for me to do work. I’m in the process of making it a more functional space where I have better organization systems, so that I can store all of my art materials without them being all over the place.

As a busy principal at a school, how do you find time for your art?

I’ve found that I hit my peak level of creativity at the earliest parts of the day before I go to work. I’m consistent with a 4:00 AM wake time, and will create from 4:00-6:00 AM before then getting ready for work. From 7:00 AM to 5ish PM my complete focus in on the school. I sometimes sneak in an extra hour of creating from 8:30-9:30 PM after putting my newborn to sleep, but it is usually just a continuation of whatever I didn’t finish earlier in the day.

Does the art teacher at your school have to work with her students in class? 

Yes, she does! She’s excellent. We’re 100% in-person, but she also did a wonderful job with teaching art while we virtual last school year. When I go to her art class, I am there as an observer/instructional coach and participant, but I am NOT the art teacher. She leads her space, and it’s my job to support her in providing a great experience for our scholars.

Do you think the Internet has opened doors for you?

100%. Instagram has been then primary way I am able to consistently share my work and gain exposure.

Do you use Photoshop with your illustrations?

I use Procreate on my iPad. I want to eventually use more Adobe products, but I’ve found a lot of comfort and ease in Procreate, and will stick with it for as long as possible. It’s a great software that is quick to learn, and helps keep work flow efficient.

Do you own or have you ever tried a graphic Drawing Tablet?

I use an iPad.

Do you think your style has changed over the years? Have your material changed?

I think that I’m still working to discover my style. I’m trying out different things each day, and practicing new techniques. A goal of mine is to do work more with physical paint, and be less digital.

What do you consider is your biggest success?

My largest success is waking up and drawing every single day. A ton of the creative process is the battle you have with yourself to draw even when you don’t feel inspired or creative. I’m proud of the discipline I’ve been able to develop.

Do you have any career dreams that you want to fulfill?

In a few years, I’ll eventually transition to being creative full time. My current career dreams are grounded in my school, but I do hope to have a large body of work and one day lead some workshops for children.

What are you working on now?

I’m currently working on this beautiful picture book titled Big Tune written by Alliah Agostini. It’s about a shy boy that’s working up his courage to bust out his dance moves at the neighborhood dancehall party.

Do you have any material tips you can share with us? Example: Paint or paper that you love – the best place to buy – a new product that you’ve tired – A how to tip, etc.

Some colored pencils I’ve really enjoyed using lately are these Koh-I-Noor Woodless Colour Pencils. I love the vibrant colors they have available, and the overall quality of the pencil. On a more basic note, I love how they still write the name of the color on the pencil. I’m partially colorblind, which makes differentiating between colors very challenging, so the name keeps me from asking my wife a hundred questions about what color something is.

Any words of wisdom on how to become a successful illustrator?

Draw every single day. Really. Every single day, and be intentional about what you draw and why you’re drawing it. Then share it. Repeat this over and over again.

Shamar, thank you for taking the time to answer the interview questions and showing us your process. Please let me know about your future books and successes so I can share them with everyone. Really enjoyed getting to meet you virtually.

To see more of Shamar’s work, you can visit him at:

Website: https://www.shamarknightjustice.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shamarknightjustice/
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shamar-knight-justice-65232a135/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/sknightjustice?lang=en
Agency: https://catagencyinc.com/shamar-knight-justice

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

Posted by: Kathy Temean | September 3, 2021

Agent of the Month: Keely Boeving

Keely Boeving is an Agent with WordServe Literary. After receiving her B.A. in English from the University of Virginia, she went on to attend the Denver Publishing Institute and then began her career in New York working in the editorial department at Oxford University Press, where she acquired books for the trade history list. She moved back to Colorado in 2014 and began her own freelance editorial company before joining WordServe in 2016. She lives in Denver with her husband and their twins. You can find out more about her editorial work at www.keelyboeving.com.

She is passionate about partnering with clients to develop books that connect with readers, find success with publishers, delight our imaginations, and create real change in the world. She is drawn to books that bring new ideas and voices to the table, change our perspectives, and broaden our experiences.

In the children’s market: Keely represents select picture books, middle grade, and young adult fiction. She represents a wide range of genres and subjects and loves stories that feature characters who are quirky and complex. She is drawn to contemporary stories that take on perennial questions in a new way, excite the imagination, and allow children to see themselves in the book’s pages, perhaps for the first time.

For Non-fiction Books: Keely is looking for well-researched nonfiction books in the areas of health and wellness, business, parenting and family life, social justice, and religious studies; as well as projects from diverse and under-represented voices and is also seeking narrative nonfiction and memoir, and occasionally represents smart, well-crafted contemporary and literary fiction.

For the Christian market: She is seeking books in the areas of Christian Living, spiritual transformation, devotion and worship, and women’s topics including motherhood, relationships and marriage, work-life balance, and calling. She represents a wide range of genres and subjects, particularly in the areas of Christian living, spiritual transformation, the intersection of faith and culture, physical and mental health, embodiment, social justice, business and entrepreneurship, and motherhood, parenting, and family life. She is always seeking projects from diverse and under-represented voices.

*******

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR SEPTEMBER 2021 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “SEPTEMBER 2021 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE” Example: Paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you put your name, the title of the piece, and genre: a picture book, chapter book, middle grade, or young adult, Non-fiction, contemporary, historical, Sci-fi, fantasy, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

PLEASE name the Word document file by putting 2021 September  – Your Name – Title of first page. Thank you.

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED! Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.

Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com. Sending it to my hotmail account will probably keep me from seeing it and including you in the running.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 20th. – noon EST

RESULTS: OCTOBER 1st.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy

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