Posted by: Kathy Temean | December 31, 2020

Happy New Year’s Eve

SATYING HOME? LET’S GET YOUR PARTY STARTED

The first New Year’s celebration dates back 4,000 years. Julius Caesar, the emperor of Rome, was the first to declare Jan. 1 a national holiday. He named the month after Janus, the Roman god of doors and gates. Janus had two faces, one looking forward and one looking back. Caesar felt that a month named after this god would be fitting.

TIMOTHY BANKS: Featured on Illustrator Saturday.

VALERIA ABATZOGLU: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. 

MICHELLE KOGAN:  www.michellekogan.com

Many people ring in New Year’s by popping open a bottle of champagne. Americans drink close to 360 million glasses of sparkling wine during this time. The bubbly stuff dates back to the 17th century, when the cork was invented.

ANIL TORTOP: Featured on Illustrator Saturday 

Make sure to be surrounded by family or loved ones on New Year’s Eve. The first person you come across in the new year could set the tone for the next 12 months. This applies to couples, as well. If a couple celebrating New Year’s together does not kiss, the future of the relationship might be splitsville, so be sure to lay one on your significant other.

ANDRE CEOLIN: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. 

JESSICA COURTNEY TICKLE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

LENA RALSTON: Featured on Illustrator Saturday. 

About 1 million people gather in New York City’s Times Square to watch the ball drop. The Times Square New Year’s Eve ball drop came about because of a ban on fireworks. The first ball in 1907 was 700 pounds and was lit with 100 25-watt lights. The current ball puts the old one to shame (thanks to technology). Today, it is covered in 2,688 crystals, is lit by 32,000 LED lights, weighs 11,875 pounds and is 12 feet in diameter. Unfortunately, this year no one will be filling Times Square to watch the ball drop. Let’s hope we will never have another year where Times Square will be empty.


ANDY IPAKTCHI: www.illustratrice.com

Don’t bundle up and head for center city Philadelphia this year to watch the Mummers Parade in Philadelphia. It is another thing not happening because of Covid. This centuries old Philly tradition normally has over 10,000 participants step through City Hall and perform in unique costumes. The parade dates back to mid-17th-century, incorporating elements from Irish, German, English, Swedish and other European heritages. The parade itself is divided into five divisions: a comic division, wench brigades, fancy division, string bands, and fancy bridges. If you are in the area for New Year’s after Covid goes away, be sure to check out this event. Again, let’s wish we never have to miss another the Mummer’s Day Parade again.

STAY HOME AND HUG SOMEONE.

DANIELA VOLPARI: FEATURED ON ILLUSTRATOR SATURDAY.

JESSICA COURTNEY TICKLE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

MICHELLE KOGAN:  www.michellekogan.com

Remember the last scene in When Harry Met Sally, when Harry references a song after he and Sally kiss? It was Auld Lang Syne, a song traditionally sung at the end of New Year’s parties. Poet Robert Burns wrote it in 1788. Though most people do not know the words to Auld Lang Syne, the overall message is that people have to remember their loved ones, dead or alive, and keep them close in their hearts.

DON’T MISS LISTENING TO AULD LANG SYNE EXPLAINED

WENDY WEHMAN: http://www.wendywahman.com

Celebrate!

Sophie slings confetti, Bobby bangs a bell.

Sister Sue is slipping through and laughing, feeling swell!

Grandpa’s starting jigging, Bernie beats a drum,

Sing and shout and dance about, the magic hour has come.

Voila!  A fancy feast appears, and Grandma’s standing near.

Hugs and Happy Holidays — a brand new year is here.

by Carol Murray

JESSICA COURTNEY TICKLE: Featured on Illustrator Saturday

If Santa is the most common symbol associated with Christmas, then Baby New Year is the symbol most commonly associated with….you guessed it, New Year’s! Baby New Year is often seen in a diaper, black top hat, and a sash showing the numbers of the new year. Myth states that he matures into an old man during the year.

Robert Burns – Auld Lang Syne – As sung by Dougie MacLean on the album Tribute

HAPPY NEW YEAR – ENJOY RINGING IN THE NEW YEAR – STAY HEALTHY AND SAFE!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Responses

  1. thanks for the history and the celebratory illustrations – happy new year, Kathy!

    Like

  2. Happy Néw Year! Beautiful illustrations everyone!!

    Like

  3. Happy New Year!

    Like

  4. Thanks for making me pause and smile, Kathy, as I so often do when reading your blog and gazing at the fabulous art you share! Happy New Year!

    Like

  5. Thanks for a fun post. Happy New Year to you, Kathy.

    Like


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