Posted by: Kathy Temean | October 31, 2020

Happy Halloween & Dia de Muertos

THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT HALLOWEEN

HAPPY HALLOWEEN

LISA GOLDBERG: Lisa was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Halloween is thought to have originated from which Celtic harvest festival, called Samhain.

AMBERIN HUQ: Amberin was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Most modern fiction describes werewolves as vulnerable to silver weapons, particularly silver bullets.

AMBERIN HUQ: Amberin was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Much of the modern supernatural lore surrounding Halloween was invented as recently as the 19th century. Scots and Irish settlers brought the custom of Mischief Night visiting to North America, where it became known as ‘trick or treat’. Until the revival of interest in Halloween during the 1970s, this American tradition was largely unknown in England. The importation of ‘trick or treat’ into parts of England during the 1980s was helped by scenes in American TV programmes and the 1982 film E.T.

KITTY MOSS: was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Trick-or-treating has origins in the Scottish and Irish tradition of guising. Typically, children would dress in costume and, after getting a treat of coins, fruits, or nuts, would perform a trick in return, usually a song, dance, or even a joke.

ANNE LAMBELET: Anne was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Vlad the Impaler influenced the creation of Count Dracula.

JESSICA COURTNEY-TICKLE: Jessica was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Samhainophobia is the fear of Halloween. This fear can also present it’s in these other types of phobias like Phasmophobia which is the fear of ghosts; wiccaphobia, the fear of witchcraft; and the fear of darkness, hyctophobia.

ARIS FALEGOS: Aris was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

The idea of Halloween as a festival of supernatural evil forces is an entirely modern invention. Urban legends about razor blades in apples and cyanide in sweets, hauntings by restless spirits and the use of 31 October as the date of evil or inauspicious events in horror films, reflect modern fears and terrors.

BRANDON JAMES SCOTT: Brandon was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.  

According to Irish legend, Jack O’Lanterns are named after a stingy man named Jack who, because he tricked the devil several times, was forbidden entrance into both heaven and hell. He was condemned to wander the Earth, waving his lantern to lead people away from their paths.

KHOA LE: Khoa was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

The specific phobia of Halloween is called samhainophobia. It is defined as a persistent fear of Halloween, despite knowing there is no danger.

MARTY KELLEY: Marty was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Americans spent over 2 billion dollars in 2018 on Halloween candy.

MARTY KELLEY: Marty was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

In a few American cities, Halloween was originally called “Cabbage Night.” The name is on a Scottish fortune-telling game in which girls would use cabbage stumps to predict who their future husband would be.

NOEL ILL: Noel was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view

Halloween is thought to have originated around 4000 B.C. Which means it has been around for over 6,000 years.

WILL TERRY: Will was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Black cats get a bad rap during this time of year because they were once believed to be protected their master’s dark powers.

ROMINA GALOTTA: Romina was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view

Folklore says, if a girl placed an apple she’d bobbed under her pillow, she would dream of her future soulmate.

MARTY KELLEY: Marty was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

The Guinness World Record for Heaviest Pumpkin is held by Mathias Willemijns from Belgium and his 2,624.6-pound pumpkin.

EMILY NELSON: Emily was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Scarecrows, a popular Halloween fixture, symbolize the ancient agricultural roots of the holiday.

SCOTT BRUNDAGE: Scott was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

The word “witch” comes from the Old English “wicce” which means “wise woman.” In fact, wiccan were highly respected people at one time. According to popular belief, witches held an important meeting on Halloween night.

YAS IMAURA: Yas was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Scottish girls believed they could see images of their future husband if they hung wet sheets in front of the fire on Halloween. Other girls believed they would see their boyfriend’s faces if they looked into mirrors while walking downstairs at midnight on Halloween.

ELLEN RYAN-EWEN: Ellen was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Black and orange are typically associated with Halloween. Orange is a symbol of strength and endurance and, along with brown and gold, stands for the harvest and autumn. Black is typically a symbol of death and darkness and acts as a reminder that Halloween once was a festival that marked the boundaries between life and death.

KAYLA STARK: Kayla was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

A child born on Halloween is said to have the ability to talk to spirits.

LISA GOLDBERG: Lisa was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Boston, Massachusetts, holds the record for the most Jack O’Lanterns lit at once (30,128).

LUCY SEMPLE: Lucy was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Love divinations on Halloween spread to England from Scotland as a result of the popularity of Robert Burn’s poem Halloween in Victorian times. One love divination mentioned by Burns includes placing hazelnuts in the fire, naming one for yourself and the other for your partner. If they burned gently and then went out, this indicated a long and harmonious life together; if they coughed and spluttered or exploded, this was a sign of problems ahead.

MACKENZIE HALEY: Mackenzie was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Both Salem, Massachusetts, and Anoka, Minnesota, are the self-proclaimed Halloween capitals of the world.

MICHAEL ROBERTSON: Michael was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

The Village Halloween parade in New York City is the largest Halloween parade in the United States. The parade includes 50,000 participants and draws over 2 million spectators – though maybe not this year.

SANDRA DE LA PRADA: Sandra was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

The original name of Count Dracula in Bram Stoker’s famous book was Count Wampyr.

SRIMALIE BASSINI: Srimalie was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view

The mask worn by Michael Myers in the Halloween films was based on the face of William Shatner.

STEPHANIE LABERIS: Stephanie was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

The owl is a popular Halloween image. In Medieval Europe, owls were thought to be witches, and to hear an owl’s call meant someone was about to die.

METTE ENGELL: Emily was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view. 

Pumpkins are classified as a fruit, not as a vegetable. In fact, in 2006, New Hampshire declared that its state fruit is the pumpkin.

SKYLAAR AMANN: Skylaar was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view

The average bag of candy that one child will collect on Halloween contains about 11,000 calories.

STEPHANIE LABERIS: Stephanie was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view

The tradition of dressing in costume came from a fear of ghosts.

XINDI YAN: Xindi was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Jack-o’-lanterns were originally made using turnips.

MICHELLE KOGAN: https://www.michellekogan.com/

HAVE A GREAT, SPOOKY Halloween!

*******

Tomorrow is Dia de los Muertos: The Day of the Dead is a Mexican holiday celebrated in Mexico and elsewhere associated with the Catholic celebrations of All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day. The multi-day holiday (November 1st and 2nd) involves family and friends gathering to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died.

 

ANA OCHOA: Ana was featured on Illustrator Saturday. Click here to view.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Responses

  1. love this post, except for the candy bag, calories

    Like

  2. So many fabulous illustrators! Love the lore, too! And this year, no loot….

    Like

  3. Great post, Kathy. The art is always nice to see, but the Halloween info was really an interesting addition! Thanks.

    Like


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