Posted by: Kathy Temean | May 18, 2018

Agent of the Month – Leslie Zampetti – Interview Part two

SEE FIRST PAGE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES AT BOTTOM OF PAGE.

LESLIE ZAMPETTI IS MAY’S FEATURED AGENT OF THE MONTH AND WILL CRITIQUE FOUR FIRST PAGES – START SUBMITTING.

Leslie joined Dunham Literary in June 2016. Previously, she was an intern for The Bent Agency.

A former librarian with over 20 years’ experience in special, public, and school libraries, Leslie has cataloged rocket launch videos and Lego rocket ship models, presented SEC documents and story times, and negotiated with organizations from Lexis-Nexis to the PTA. Her experience as a librarian has given her a distinct perspective on publishing and readers. A writer herself, Leslie is very familiar with querying from both sides of the desk.

Leslie graduated from Wake Forest University with a degree in English and has a Master’s of Library and Information Science degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
She is available to speak at conferences.

You can follow her on Twitter @leslie_zampetti.

​Member:
AAR
SCBWI

What She’s Seeking

For children’s books, Leslie seeks middle grade and young adult novels, especially mystery and contemporary. Historical fiction set in the recent past, novels in verse, and off-the-beaten path romances are on her wish list. For picture books, Leslie wants unusual true tales, biographies of unsung heroes and heroines, or stories that show everyday diversity to mirror under-represented readers and open windows to others. She is drawn to books about Florida, baseball, and kids with book smarts and big hearts.

For adult fiction, Leslie is interested in literary mysteries, upmarket romance and women’s fiction, and historical fiction from lesser-known eras and places. For nonfiction, Leslie finds narrative nonfiction that straddles the boundaries between crime, memoir, and literature especially appealing. An armchair adventurer, Leslie enjoys experiencing wild places and extreme challenges from the comfort of her chair.

BELOW IS PART ONE OF MY INTERVIEW WITH LESLIE:

How far do you normally read before you reject a submission?

As long as it takes.

I try to give all requested submissions the same number of pages as I give my library books – 10% of the book. If I’m not enjoying my library book 10% in, back it goes! Life is too short, and there are too many books to read. 

Any pet peeves?

The usual suspects. (Such as starting with the main character waking up, etc.) My biggest pet peeve is receiving a rude or snarky response to a rejection.

Do you let people know if you’re not interested?

Yes, we respond to every query at Dunham Literary.

How long does it usually take to respond to requested material?

Between two and three months. I try to read requested manuscripts as soon as possible, but between requests, contests, and clients, it can be hard. I would rather manage expectations and delight someone by responding earlier than have to ask for more time.

Have you noticed any common mistakes that writers make?

The biggest mistake is introducing yourself at the beginning of your query. I want to know about your book. You can come later.

I’ve also seen a lot of submissions where the premise is great, the writing is good, but the story is nowhere near ready. The first chapter or two are very polished, but the same care hasn’t been taken with the rest of the story.

Do you have a place where writers can visit to stay up-to-date on what you would like to see? Blog?

I’m on Twitter – @leslie_zampetti. I’m also on Manuscript Wish List (http://www.manuscriptwishlist.com). I had a blog for several years (as a writer and librarian), but I gave it up a few months ago. I need that time to read! 

Do you give editorial feedback to your clients?

Yes. I am a very hands-on agent.

Would you represent a children’s book illustrator or a writer/illustrator?

I personally am not looking for illustrator clients. Jennie does represent both writer/illustrators and illustrators, however. Never say never, though!

Do you see any new trends in the industry?

Trends come and go. Write what you need to. The reality is “what goes up must come down.” True for publishing, true for fashion, true for life.

What is your typical response time to email/phone calls with your clients?

Very quick. I try to respond the same day.

STOP BACK NEXT FRIDAY TO READ PART THREE OF LESLIE’S INTERVIEW.


 

HERE ARE THE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR MAY FIRST PAGE CRITIQUES:

In the subject line, please write “MAY 2018 FIRST PAGE CRITIQUE” and paste the text in the email, plus attached it as a Word document to the email. Please make sure you include your name, the title of the piece, and whether it’s a picture book, middle grade, or young adult, etc. at the top on both the email and the Word document (Make sure you include your name with the title of your book, when you save the first page).

REMEMBER: ATTACH THE WORD DOCUMENT AND NOT GET ELIMINATED!Your First Page Word document should be formatted using one inch margins and 12 point New Times Roman font – double space – no more than 23 lines – only one page.Send to: kathy(dot)temean(at)gmail(dot)com.

PLEASE FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES: Your submission will be passed over if you do not follow the directions for both the pasted email and the attached Word doc. This is where most people mess up.

DEADLINE: May 25th.
RESULTS: June 1st.

Please only submit one first page a month, but do try again if your first page wasn’t one of the pages randomly picked. Thanks!

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Categories

%d bloggers like this: