Posted by: Kathy Temean | November 26, 2017

Book Giveaway – 7 Keys to Research for Writing Success

David L. Harrison and Mary Jo Fresch have written a new book titled, 7 KEYS TO RESEARCH FOR WRITING SUCCESS, They have agreed to do a book giveaway. It is also a great book for all of you who would like to come up with ideas to use with kids in the classroom.

All you have to do to get in the running is to leave a comment. Reblog, tweet, or talk about it on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you did to share the good news, so I can put in the right amount of tickets in my basket for you. Check back to discover the winner.

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Before actual writing occurs, writers prepare. With these words, award-winning children’s author David Harrison affirms the importance of teaching students the necessary steps of prewriting—from choosing a viable topic to conducting in-depth research to taking effective notes and organizing them. In this book David offers insights into his prewriting process, while educator Mary Jo Fresch translates his methods into engaging lessons that develop students’ research skills to enhance their writing.

BOOK’S JOURNEY:

David:

Hi, Kathy. Thanks very much for inviting us to join you on your blog. Mary Jo and I are delighted by the way our new book has turned out. One educator who’s seen it said, “It’s got to be a best seller,” and naturally we agree! 

We began work on 7 Keys to Research for Writing Success in 2013 although that wasn’t the title then. And the title isn’t the only thing that changed along the way. By the time a book is published the message is clear and all the pieces fit, but bringing a book from vision to reality is often a messy process with many false starts and revised approaches. Mary Jo, do you remember when a casual remark by an editor at Shell sparked our initial interest in setting out on this journey? 

Mary Jo:

Our collaboration on a series of books focused on phonemic and phonological awareness was such fun…your beautiful poetry that kids adore…my ideas to turn them into dynamic lessons for our youngest learners.  The poems begged to have lessons about rhyme and rhythm, but also content such as science and math.  The editor got us thinking about how we could use what YOU do as an author to help students be better prepared to write. After all, as David says, we can’t do our best writing until we are ready! Your work as an author – writing poetry, fiction, and nonfiction – seemed like a perfect model to help students be better researchers. And away we went! 

David:

Away we went for sure! Through a series of SKYPE sessions, input from editors, and chats with classroom teachers, we decided that our book didn’t need to be about writing. There already are excellent titles about the writing process out there. What we did NOT find was much information about what writers do BEFORE they are ready to write. It was the “aha!” moment. Preparing to write — doing the presearch and research about our subject – shapes what we say and how we say it when the time comes to do the writing. Adults who write may know this, but elementary students may not. This was the ideal way to tap into my experience as a writer and Mary Jo’s deep knowledge about motivating students to provide a much needed service to teachers (and their kids!). 

Mary Jo:

So true, David! There are lots of books about “how to” teach writing out there, but we found very little on how to help students learn to be researchers. We found scant advice such as – “look at books,” “enlist the librarian….” – but none that really took students step by step through topic selection, asking good questions, finding reliable resources (as author Dan Brown says, “Google is not a synonym for research”), taking notes, and preparing to write. So, we decided to focus on those first, important steps to help students become independent researchers.  It, is indeed, a lifelong skill…so let’s start developing that early on. 

David:

We have many people to thank for their roles in the making of our book. We are grateful for the invaluable help from experienced teachers who offered sound advice and provided samples of their students’ work as they followed Mary Jo’s great classroom activities. They include reflecting on memories as one way to focus topic selection, posing good questions about our topic, presearching to see if our topic is too big or too narrow, choosing keywords, evaluating resources, notetaking, and organizing our notes to create an outline for our writing. We also thank our wonderful editor at Scholastic, Maria Chang, for her wit and wisdom throughout the process of getting this book to print. Our book has just been released and we have high hopes that teachers will soon find it and pass the word to others. To help promote it, Mary Jo and I are presenting on the subject at NCTE. 

Mary Jo:

We are really looking forward to being in St. Louis for NCTE! During our presentation (Friday, November 17; 12:30—1:45) we will take participants through all seven lessons David mentioned. It’s a perfect time to have a hands-on experience with learning to be a researcher through a peer supported model. We think teachers will have a fun time and learn critical skills they can take back to their classrooms.  Hey – maybe we will give a book or two away! We will be in the Scholastic booth after the presentation…so we invite everyone to stop by to say “hello” and take a look at our newest book. See you in St. Louis! 

DAVID’S BIO:

David Harrison has published ninety-two titles that have earned dozens of honors, including the Christopher Award for The Book of Giant Stories.  His work has been translated into twelve languages, anthologized more than one hundred eighty-five times, and appeared in over eighty magazines and professional journals. In Springfield, MO, David Harrison Elementary School is named for him. His poem, “My Book,” is sandblasted into The Children’s Garden sidewalk at the Burton Barr Library in Phoenix, Arizona and painted on a bookmobile in Pueblo, Colorado. David’s poetry inspired Sandy Asher’s popular, award winning school plays, Somebody Catch My Homework and Jesse and Grace and has been set to music performed for numerous live audiences. In 2007, the Missouri Librarian Association presented David with its Literacy Award for the body of his work. David holds science degrees from Drury and Emory universities and honorary doctor of letters degrees from Missouri State University and Drury University. He is poet laureate of Drury. David lives with his wife, Sandy, a business owner and retired guidance counselor. He is working on many new books.

http://davidlharrison.com
http://davidlharrison.wordpress.com

MARY JO’S BIO:

Mary Jo Fresch is a professor emeritus of The Ohio State University’s Department of Teaching and Learning. Fresch’s teaching experiences include third grade through college. She speaks nationally and internationally about literacy-related topics and researches the developmental aspect of literacy learning. Her articles have appeared in peer reviewed journals, such as the Journal of Literacy Research; Reading and Writing Quarterly; Reading Psychology; The Reading Teacher; Language Arts; Journal of Just and Caring Education; and Journal of Children’s Literature.  She has authored or co-authored 19 books for teachers, including Strategies for Effective Balanced Literacy; Engaging Minds in English Language Arts Classrooms: The Surprising Power of Joy; The Power of Picture Books: Using Content Area Literature in Middle School; and Learning Through Poetry.

Thank you David and Mary Jo for sharing your book and it’s journey with us. Looks like a winner to me. Here is the link to Amazon.

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Responses

  1. Looks like a great resource to inspire kids–and adults!

    Like

  2. Looks wonderful, I’d love to have a copy, thanks for the chance to win one.
    For extra entries I tweeted a link: https://twitter.com/carlrscott/status/934838724776431617, and pinned an image on Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/pin/336573772143749303/. Thanks again, have a great day!

    Like

  3. What an interesting and interactive way for kids to get behind “research” and its importance in the writing process. I’d LOVE a copy of this book to add to my collection.

    Like

  4. This is a great resource for children and adults. I will definitely share this with my teacher friends on Facebook.

    Like

  5. Sounds like a great book!

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  6. Thank you, Kathy, for helping us get out the word about our new book. And thanks to everyone for your comments and support. We’re eager to let everyone know about 7 KEYS TO RESEARCH FOR WRITING SUCCESS!

    Like

  7. Thank you Kathy! Good luck everyone!

    Like

  8. I am sure my teaching colleagues would love this resource. Looks wonderful!

    Like

  9. What a great resource for classroom teachers!

    Like

  10. Excited to add to prewriting knowledge with presearch information.

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  11. I’m interested in reading this to improve my own writing! Then I’d love to pass it on to the elementary school in my hometown.

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  12. This is an important topic and I would love to learn what it has to teach me. Thanks for the opportunity to win one!

    Like

  13. This looks like a great resource for all writers and it is exactly what I need! Thanks to David and Mary Jo for teaming up to cover pre-writing research. I have re-posted to my FB page too. https://www.facebook.com/Nancynovelist/.

    Like

  14. WOW, Mary Jo and David, what a fantastic approach to teaching kids how to write! Just wonderful 🙂 Congrats!

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    • Thanks so much!

      Like

  15. This would be great for our school library!

    Like

  16. This book looks great! (And Mary Jo- Go Bucks!)

    Like

    • OH!

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  17. Excited to review the book!

    Like


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