Posted by: Kathy Temean | March 23, 2015

Pace & Opportunity

Napping 8 x 10
Now that Spring is here. I thought this fun illustration by Carrie O’Neill would inspire everyone to go outside, enjoy the nice weather, and talk to the neighbors. Carrie is an artist and illustrator living in Olympia, Washington.  Her favorite media are watercolor and ink.  To see more of her work, visit:  www.carrieoneill.com.

DavidheadshotI haven’t mention David L. Harrison in a while. For all you writers who write poems and or lyrical proses, you should check out his blog. It is a good place to take up the challenge of writing a poem based on the Word of the Month. You can read what other writers have written and meet nice, like minded people. I thought what he posted yesterday on his blog would be of interest to everyone here.

Is pace a thought stopper? Who knew?

noun
1.
a rate of movement, especially in stepping, walking, etc.:
“to walk at a brisk pace of five miles an hour.”
2.
a rate of activity, progress, growth, performance, etc.; tempo.
3.
any of various standard linear measures, representing the space naturally measured by the movement of the feet in walking: roughly 30 to 40 inches (75 cm to 1 meter).
Compare geometrical pace, military pace, Roman pace.
4.
a single step:
“She took three paces in the direction of the door.”
5.
the distance covered in a step:
“Stand six paces inside the gates.”
6.
a manner of stepping; gait.
7.
a gait of a horse or other animal in which the feet on the same side are lifted and put down together.
Expand
verb (used with object), paced, pacing.
10.
to set the pace for, as in racing.
11.
to traverse or go over with steps:
“He paced the floor nervously.”
12.
to measure by paces.
13.
to train to a certain pace; exercise in pacing:
“to pace a horse.”
14.
(of a horse) to run (a distance) at a pace:
“Hanover II paced a mile.”
verb (used without object), paced, pacing.
15.
to take slow, regular steps.
16.
to walk up and down nervously, as to expend nervous energy.
17.
(of a horse) to go at a pace.
Idioms
18.
put through one’s paces, to cause someone to demonstrate his or her ability or to show her or his skill:
“The French teacher put her pupils through their paces for the visitors.”
19.
set the pace, to act as an example for others to equal or rival; be the most progressive or successful:
“an agency that sets the pace in advertising.”

David is the author of over 80 children’s books. Stop by his website: http://www.davidlharrison.com to read more about him. To join the fun and write you own poem using the Word of the Month, visit his blog. http://www.davidlharrison.wordpress.com

Talk tomorrow,

Kathy


Responses

  1. Thank you, Kathy. I appreciate your support and will welcome anyone who decides to drop by to visit the blog you created for me in 2009!


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